Rugby and Ruins

Hello again!

I’m starting back up in lectures again, and so I’m also starting back up in blogging too! As promised last weekend, this will be a story about rugby and the Museum of London. Let us begin…

I am somewhat familiar with rugby, as I once tried out and briefly trained with the women’s rugby team at my high school. I quickly found out in just the training that I wasn’t cut out for it and my mother silently thanked the heavens for saving my teeth. 😛 However, that was also nearly 10 years ago, so what little I knew was pretty rusty. We’ve seen the university rugby teams around town this year, but all I’ve learned from them is that they’re like the UK equivalent of a fraternity in the hijinks they get into. We most recently saw them come into a pub dressed as a walking nativity scene (and that’s one of the tamer evenings).

So when I was offered the chance to come along to a proper rugby match here in Leicester, I was a total noob but totally excited to go. And it was well worth the chilly weather and wet seats to go! Leicester were up against their rival Bath, and Leicester came out with a fantastic 17-8 finish. At this point, I was hoping to find a great YouTube video to give a better explanation of the game than I would mumble out, but it appears that no one has made such a video yet. Instead, I will send you to WikiHow who can explain the basics without mucking it up like I inevitably will. Basically, I’m still lost at times, but I will definitely be going back to another game. I find it to be much more engaging than American football!

Later in the week, I also got a day to go and visit the Museum of London and I must recommend a visit if you’ve got some time to spare in the city! The museum is actually in the square mile of the City of London and has managed to be built both beside and IN a roundabout. It can prove a challenge to get inside, but once in it’s pretty darn cool. They’ve been tasked with telling the history of the city from before it was known as London to the modern era, and they’ve got a plethora of artefacts all the way through. If you look for it though, you can see which collections are their largest and which have likely been siphoned off to other museums in the area. The prehistoric section and semi-modern eras of London are well represented, but the Roman era sees a lot of (well done) reproductions and the plague era is skipped over almost entirely.

However, the Museum of London is fascinating with their collection of human remains – the largest in the UK! In nearly every exhibit they seem to have a skull that tells the human story of the era. There have been many facial reconstructions and explanations of how archaeologists have discovered much more about the past through them. In the sections lacking in original artefacts, these human remains and excellent reproductions (both 1:1 ratios and miniatures) of rooms and buildings of the time help keep their visitors engaged. It’s free to visit and right off of the Barbican Tube stop, so pop by if you’re near.

Anyhow, that’s all for now folks! I’ll talk to you later. 🙂

— Kate