New Year, but not new resolutions as such.

I think I did New Year Resolutions like twice when I was a teenager and they always fail by March at the latest. Writing down something major to change and then just expecting to stick to it through the year is a hilarious and depressing way to start a year. Heck, I’ll be struggling to remember it’s 2018 and not 2017 until April. Why would I expect major life changes to stick so easily?

Instead dear readers, I’ve decided to do a year of 30(ish) day challenges. If I can make it through a month and it sticks, awesome. If not, it’s only 30 days, and that’s something worthwhile in itself. I won’t lie, I’ve done some of these challenges because I wanted to fit it neatly into this blog. Also, I realised a lot of the original challenges were weight and diet related and it looked a bit bleak. Whilst weight is a big issue for me, I don’t want it to take over my life for a year!

There will be some things that overlap and some overlying things that runneth over. For starters, actually sticking to my calorie target for bare minimum weight loss will be in the background this year, particularly in this first quarter of the year, which I have termed the Diet Quarter. Speaking of which, the other three quarters have been named as well – the Willpower Quarter, the Mental Health Quarter, and the Exercise Quarter. Why is exercise at the end of the year you ask? Well for one, M would graciously let me attempt all the cooking over Christmas, but we all know that would end poorly. Secondly, enjoying nature for 30 minutes is much more pleasant when you aren’t cold and being rained on. Also, I’ve got grand ambitions for starting jump rope as an overlying thing that will runneth over throughout.

So here below is the approximate plan for the year:

The Diet Quarter



A traditional Dry January, with some provisos. Our wedding anniversary is right in the middle of the month, and I want to celebrate it with something more than Diet Coke. I do not want to hear about your mocktail ideas instead. Just let me have this. It won’t be as strict as my Sober October challenge was, as I’m not raising money in my name. If you feel so inclined, I’ll leave a link for one off donations to the UK eating disorder charity Beat¬†throughout the first three months as part of the Diet Quarter. Be healthy in what you do and all that, yeah?


No snacks. Sounds easy, will likely be very hard. Having tracked my food throughout the year, I know full well that snacks are the main reason I am not back at the weight I want to be. Mercifully a 28 day challenge, but hoping this one will stick.


Mindful eating and all that jazz. Mostly just retraining myself to eat small, slow bites and not eat meals like a starving animal. I’m halfway tempted to buy one of those forks that vibrates if you’re eating too quickly, but may just eat everything with tiny cutlery for children over the first fortnight. That would at least bring humour into the situation. This is also a good challenge to gear myself up with for the next quarter as well.

Sweet dreams are made of this.

The Willpower Quarter


The no-money month. Okay, okay. Obviously some money will be spent, but on things that absolutely have to be had – food, toiletries, train tickets – those kinds of things. Again, looking back over bank statements over the last year, I am guilty of buying snacks at the station, ordering takeaways when we had food we could make, and buying random toys and clothes under retail therapy that while used didn’t need to be bought. It would be really nice to be able to take all that money saved and throw it at some debt.


No mindlessly checking my phone when I’m at home. We all do this, and I think we all know it’s not great (especially around other people). So for the month of May, if I’m at home my phone will be allowed to roam the house with me and I can answer calls and texts, but will have to be left in pre-decided Phone Homes where I can’t readily pick it up and scroll out of boredom/fidgetiness. I married a great guy, and I should be using the limited time in the day to actually see and talk to him, not just show the poor soul the latest internet memes. He’ll just get those while I’m on the train. ūüėČ


Rolling into the mental health of the next round will be finding something nice to say about myself every day. Listing general good things about the world is much easier than being kind to myself, and that’s incredibly messed up. So to push myself into a new mindset, let’s use all of this newfound willpower to start thinking nice thoughts.

The cats of the internet will have to wait.

The Mental Health Quarter


Spend at least 30 minutes a day outside in nature. Like proper nature, not just a walk around the block or a stroll from one museum down Exhibition Road and into another. I’m setting down the rule that the 30 minutes have to be walking on something unpaved. I’m debating if listening to podcasts whilst wandering is acceptable. We shall see. Regardless, getting out every day and getting some sun while this country actually sees any is going to be important.


Taking over cooking. I should explain. I am physically capable of cooking. I have actually cooked things successfully. I still cook occasionally when M is on night shifts. Generally though, he does the cooking and I’ll help out occasionally and otherwise clean up the leftover mess. It works, and we both like the roles we have. However, everyone always tells me that it’s therapeutic to cook, and that it’s good for the soul and all that. So I thought I’d give it one more go and see if by the end of the month I too have achieved the chef’s nirvana I hear rumour of.


Easing out of the mental health months will be a month-long project of writing down the different aspects of my life that I am thankful for. These always start off easy, then get cheesy, then get downright ridiculous before being abandoned somewhere around Day 16 at most. This time, I’d like to finish a full 30 days. It’ll be interesting to see where I end up delving towards the end, and also finding out if there are any themes that emerge.

See? There’s some greenery.

The Exercise Quarter


Actually getting 10,000 steps EVERY DAY for a month. Usually if I’m on a work day, I get all the steps. However, any holidays or weekends are usually atrocious. Right now post-Christmas, my FitBit says I have an average of 5,998 steps per day if that gives you an idea of it. I’d like to add a monetary challenge to this to incentivise myself and make it hurt if I don’t reach it, but I don’t want to give money to some Evil Organisation. Also, if it goes towards something like a gadget for M that would drive me crazy, he’ll likely try to hamper said efforts. I’ll need to think about this one.


Stairs only. I will regret this with every fibre of my being with any deep line tube travel. I will definitely regret it with the fact that I currently work on the 5th floor (US 6th floor) of the building. But if this challenge doesn’t fall under exercise, I don’t know what would.


Finally, I want to end the year with some extra space in my clothes so I can eat ALL the cheeses. I’ve finally stopped lying to myself and telling myself I’ll run in the winter. Instead, I’ve found a few indoor 30 minutes or less routines. I’ll pick one closer to time and subject myself to it for the month. I may even convince the Significant Otter to join in. Maybe.

Okay, these stairs could get a pass on grounds of health and safety.

So there we are – game plan for the year laid out. Now to see what madness comes of it, and to see if only taking little steps of 30 days at a time makes it any easier for things to stick. Wish me luck?


— Kate

Into the Medieval District, Part One

It has been raining continuously today since I woke up at 7. I didn’t have any particular desire to go anywhere today, and this rain has really just confirmed that. However, I’ve become a slave to my FitBit since it arrived on my birthday, and it’s showing an embarrassing 738 out of 10,000 steps today. Reading and writing may be good for the mind, but they are poor¬†on the body. It’s far too grim to take photos of the outside of old buildings today, so I may pop back up to the Cathedral and take some photographs inside. They’re¬†still¬†doing construction on the outer gate, so the Ethelbert and Erpingham Gate photos will have to wait.

In the meanwhile, I still have a stockpile of other places in the city that I’ve visited. Norwich is a city that offers so much, but is also infinitely walkable in the same go. Though the city was targeted by the Germans during WWII for its cultural importance, a healthy amount of the medieval district still stands. Today we shall focus on three of the older structures in town – Cow Tower, Adam & Eve, and Elm Hill.

Cow Tower

I suppose I probably shouldn’t have done Cow Tower without explaining the Great Hospital, but there we are. Regardless, Cow Tower was built in 1278 by the monks of the Great Hospital. It was meant to be a tollhouse and later was used as a prison. By 1378 it was given to the city and was repurposed yet again as a freestanding artillery tower. The name is believed to come from the water meadow on which it sits, which was known as Cowholme. Sadly, no cows have ever lived inside the tower as far as anyone can tell. Unlike the castle, this tower has not been kept up during the years or restored to what it might have looked like whilst it was in use. This means that only the stone shell is standing and that they’ve put a barred gate at the entrance to keep any would-be climbers out. As you can tell from my photos you can still get a great view, but it’s now been reduced to a nice brief stopping point along the Riverside Walk through the city.

Adam & Eve Pub

The Adam & Eve is supposedly the oldest pub in Norwich. It has been mentioned in documents as far back as 1249, and was originally meant to be a brewhouse for the builders of Norwich Cathedral, only a few minutes away. Archaeology suggests that the spot has been used for much longer, and evidence of a Saxon well has been found underneath the pub. My American friends will be disappointed that the interior doesn’t look particularly ancient, but I promise they serve a great selection of beer, ale, and cider. They even do lunch and dinners, though we’ve never gotten around to trying them. It’s worth popping by for a drink after you’ve visited the Cathedral.

Elm Hill

Okay, so technically Elm Hill is an entire street and not just one building. However,¬†Elm Hill is the city’s most famous medieval street. Among its fine collection of preserved Tudor buildings is the Briton Arms – the sole survivor of a city fire in 1507 and one of only five thatched buildings remaining in the city centre. Also, the Strangers Club at 22-24 Elm Hill was once the residence of a wealthy Norfolk family, the Pastons, who are famous for their letters describing everyday life in the 1400s. Do not wear heels on this street if you value your ankles, as they are still steep and covered in cobblestones.

With that, it sounds like it’s time for me to fortify myself and get my rainboots on for the walk to the cathedral. Wish me luck!

— Kate

Getting a Look at Norwich.

Holy crow, as my mother pointed out to me today, I am “a 26 year old WOMAN now. Engaged to be married and with two university degrees.” I don’t know when this all happened and I started to look like an accomplished individual, but it sure feels like it snuck up on me. It was a great birthday though! Had a laid back weekend with friends that made a seriously superb steak dinner and didn’t even do too badly when England lost to Wales in the Rugby World Cup. For the birthday proper, we stayed in and opened gifts, then had some takeaway curry and drinks. Low key with lovely people – just the way a birth-week should be. ūüôā

Since I now have more time available other than sleep, commute, work, commute, eat, sleep, I’ve been spending more time getting to know the layout of Norwich. It’s such a pretty city, and while the weather is behaving I intend to make the most of it and get in those coveted 10,000 steps a day! I know there are also lovelies coming to visit over the winter, so I wanted to give them a good sense of what should be seen in the city and what can be missed if time restraints are at play. The city council actually has a pretty impressive heritage scene, but appear to have chosen this summer/autumn to work on a few of their “Norwich Twelve” historic places of note. As it stands, I’d rather just wait until the scaffolding comes down before trying to get photos of a few of them, like the Norwich Cathedral and Dragon Hall. They deserve better justice than I could currently give them.

In the meanwhile, I’ll be posting about 3 spots worth of a visit per post, even if I’m investigating more during the week. I can’t help but predict another week of biblical rain coming up, so it’s best to stockpile some. In absolutely no particular order or even places close to each other (gotta get the step count somehow), I give you – This Week in Norwich!

Firstly, there is a castle in Norwich, and it is lovely. It is said to be one of the finest surviving Norman castles in Europe. The castle was built in the 11th century as a royal palace for William the Conquerer with the huge stone keep being a symbol of the king’s power at a time when most new buildings were small wooden structures. The Norwich Castle mound is the largest castle mound in the country. From the 14th century the Castle no longer served the purpose of a Royal Castle and for the next 500 years was used as a prison. In 1890, the castle and surrounding buildings were converted into a museum.

In terms of a modern museum, you definitely get your money’s worth. They’ve somehow managed to combine a natural history museum, an art gallery, and a history museum together. Oh, and then they’ve got a separate bit just for the castle’s history. You’d definitely want the guided tour of the castle keep though. There’s a lot of history that they don’t really mention in the signs around the building. You can also pop in for lunch or tea without having to go into the museum, and they even offer picnic basket lunches when the weather is nice so you can eat outside on the castle mound.

Next, there is the Church of St Peter Mancroft. The largest church in Norwich, it is outfitted with a tower containing 14 bells and is unlike any other in the city. The building represents the most striking example of Perpendicular style in the country. There was a Norman church on the site before it was rebuilt between 1420 and 1455 as the building you see today. Inside the church, light can easily reach the single span hammer beam roof from the many large and beautiful windows Рthe most magnificent being the east window with its stunning medieval stained glass.

Though it’s in the middle of a busy portion of town, it is always quiet and soothing inside this building. They’re open every day from 10-4 and you are always welcome to come sit and pray, or to wander around quietly and enjoy the history and architecture of the church. It’s free to visit, but they’ll gladly take donations, and I’d highly recommend going in for a few minutes to enjoy the peaceful atmosphere.

City Hall

A quick detour if you’re already by St Peter Mancroft and like newer architecture, City Hall sits right next door.¬†In 1919, the city council had outgrown the traditional Guildhall, but did not want to demolish the building. A national competition was held in 1931 for the design, and was won by London architects Charles Holloway and Stephen Rowland Pierce. The clock tower holds the largest clock bell in the UK and the hall boasts the longest balcony in England. I think you can go in and tour, but I felt pretty judged for taking photos of the outside and didn’t feel like pressing my luck.

Finally, on a cheesy (or should I say mustard-y?) note, there is always Colman’s Mustard Shop & Museum.¬†Celebrating the 150th anniversary of Colman’s Mustard, this museum and shop was opened and become one of the city’s premier tourist attractions. (So says the council’s informational brochure anyway.) ¬†It’s more like 75% shop, 25% museum, but it’s got some nifty facts about the company and more mustard kitsch than you could ever dream about. Have you heard of mustard foot soaks to restore your aching feet? Me either, but you can buy the kit! The shop/museum is in the middle of a really nice arcade shopping lane, so it’s worth walking by at least to enjoy the scenery along the way. Or you know, to get your mustard party on, I suppose.

More news next week!

— Kate

A picture is worth a thousand words, so I’ll try to keep it brief.

Since last we spoke, M and I have moved to the lovely city of Norwich! It was nothing short of a miracle getting it all in one moving van and was only feasible thanks to his fantastic family taking time out of their schedules to help us lug our lives northwards.

Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 12.29.21
We’ve still got boxes to be unpacked. They’ve just been moved to the cellar.

After moving in over the weekend, it was straight back to work for M and starting work for me. St Paul’s Cathedral was an amazing experience and a gorgeous building, and if you haven’t been there you need to go already. Shame on you. I mean, look at this!

In two months so much happened, but it can be most accurately be described in simplistic numbers. The eight weeks summed up as:

  • 1 bookshelf purchased
  • 14 books read on trains
  • 2 Tube strikes occurred
  • 250+ objects catalogued for potential accession
  • ~3800 miles¬†commuted
  • ??? cups of tea imbibed
  • 150+ books checked for mould and packed for renovation
  • 7+ BBQs cooked
  • 4 houseplants acquired
  • 3 pairs of shoes died
  • 9 station stops between Stockport and Norwich on our journey back from an epic 90s birthday party
  • 2 bouquets of surprise flowers
  • 1 proposal

Oh yes, it finally happened! He asked and I said yes and we’ve been looking at wedding arrangements ever since. ūüôā

Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 12.35.38

We’ve got the venue sorted and the registrar booked and hopefully dresses should all be done by the end of the week. The next big event will be the Notice Of Marriage appointment, which will be next week. Here in the UK, you can’t have an overnight wedding. You have to give notice with a set amount of time before the day. It’s kind of like an elongated version of the officiant asking if anyone sees any reason why the couple cannot be married. Also, it’s only for civil ceremonies that they do this. I believe¬†if you have one in a church that they have their own version of a waiting period to make sure you want to proceed. Really not a bad idea to consider in the US.

On that note, I’ll likely be going on about weddings and the ASTOUNDING amount of rain there’s been in Norwich as of late, so be prepared. I’m so excited for this! (The wedding, not the rain!) ūüėÄ

— Kate

Dissertation Delays

On the bright side, my dissertation is complete. On the darker side, it’s currently on a computer I’m locked out of this afternoon. Thankfully, I can get to it by this evening in a worst case scenario. It’s really strange being finished with it and having a few days left to spare. Not sure what I’m going to do for the next few days.

Oh wait, yes I do. I’m going to be packing things. I moved out of Leicester at the end of June, and now the favourite human and I are about to turn around and move to Norwich due to work commitments. He’s going to have an hour commute, and I’ll be on a two-hour commute down to London for my internship. Public transport for both of us, so I imagine we’ll both be sleeping whilst riding in the mornings. I’d say chatting with friends¬†on the ride back, but phone service is admirably spotty on the train lines. I’m thinking attempting to re-read the Harry Potter series over the two months.

It’s going to be another shift in life, but it’s one I’m looking forward to happening. It’s going to be a house and not a flat for a change, and one we both get to create¬†together, rather than feeling like a squatter in each other’s places. It’ll also be doing work directly in a museum environment for me, and I’m so excited to be out of the abstract of academia and back into the real world! From here on out it’s a great internship and job applications galore.

Also in terms of shift, it also feels like it’s time to shift this blog a bit. I suppose you can be a tourist forever, but if you want to live somewhere permanently, it becomes detrimental. I’ll continue to write (and hopefully a little more regularly), but rather than being an intrepid reporter for all things *different* between the US and the UK, I’d like to just write about life as it happens. Things that surprise, comfort, amuse, confuse even. It’s not going to devolve into a Dear Diary thing (I hope), but it just feels more and more awkward to write in the style I have been for the last few months. Instead, I’m going to try to tell stories. Hopefully decently written stories, but stories of settling into a new phase in my life and of all the cast that appear in it. I might even do an overhaul of the blog layout!

So let us spring forth with a new Kate, unencumbered by blog traditions! I’ll start this reformat with a piece I’ve adapted from my fellow blogger Inspired Life and list 20 things I’ve either learned about myself this year, or things about myself that have changed over the last few months.

  1. The further into academia I delve, the worse my cleaning obsessions get. Before university, I was a messy lady. Now, I’ve been spotted vacuuming and wiping counters on a regular basis. I even make the bed! (The bathroom remains the bane of my existence though.)
  2. My accent seems unlikely to change in the near future. The idioms have altered, but I still very commonly stand out as an American. And honestly, I’m fine with it. At first I wanted to do everything I could to blend in quickly, but now I’m finding it alright to just be who I am. Within reason anyway.
  3. I’m learning to better accept that not everyone will like me, and that sometimes you just can’t do anything about it. It stings to find out someone thinks ill of you, but you really can’t please everyone. Just try to be kind in general.
  4. I have been an idiot. Oh, hindsight. I count this as a good thing though. If I can look back at things I’ve done and realised it was a poor choice, then that means at least I’m not as likely to do it again.
  5. There is always time to read. You don’t realise how much TV and internet sucks up your time until you start reading more and realise how far behind you are on pop culture. There’s a balance to it I suppose. I managed to read 53 books last year, and I’m up to 28 so far this year. Some have been school books of course, but a good portion are just for pleasure. The not having to drive places thing really does help with this.
  6. I’ve reached the age where I no longer put my head to the pillow and don’t wake up again until the alarm buzzes. It’s never been insomnia for more than a day, but I’m commonly awake briefly in the middle of the night. We’ll definitely need to move the bed away from the wall in our new place, as being awake in the middle of the night is useless when you’re the one stuck facing the window.
  7. Just like when we moved across the US, there are things I miss from US. Would I want to move back? Not really. Would I like to visit often? Most definitely!
  8. Living the first year of my life with no animals in it has been rough. My chivalric love of cats from afar is getting ridiculous.
  9. I’ve realised that sometimes, the cheapest plane ticket¬†is just not worth it.
  10. Having friends around the world is a fantastic thing, and the ones that keep in contact after all this time will likely be friends for life. With that said, it also really sucks when all your friends are nowhere nearby and you’ve got nothing to do on a Friday night.
  11. I have grown to greatly appreciate adequate public transport. It’ll be nice to drive again at some point, but being able to get nearly anywhere you need to go with public transport and your own two feet is phenomenal.
  12. I’m not sure how long I have to live here to stop being surprised by things, but today is not that day.
  13. I still hold firm that rain and thunderstorms are great. Mists and fogs of water consistently pouring from the sky all day? Not great.
  14. I’ve not gotten any slimmer than when I got here, but for possibly the first time in my life, I’m beginning to feel comfortable in my own skin.
  15. There is, in fact, a point where I can see too many ancient buildings. I never thought it was possible, but here we are.
  16. My alcohol tolerance has gone up considerably since moving to England, but I still don’t think I’ll ever manage to get to the level of drunkenness that the English manage grandly. It’s truly a sight to behold.
  17. I’m not sure I want to continue my education past a master’s degree. I think it might actually break me to attempt a PhD.
  18. If I did go back for a PhD though, it’d be back to my one true love of anthropology and not in museum studies.
  19. Being totally alone in a new city where no one knows who you are and you can do and see what you please is one of the most liberating things in the world. I’d recommend everyone should try it once, even if it’s just a cool new city nearby your hometown.
  20. Watching and learning how a culture works is very different from being immersed in a culture yourself. It’s very easy to say, “Well that’s different from what I know, but it seems to work for them.” It’s much more difficult to allow yourself to be placed into different cultural norms and not rebel against them. Some you will come to accept and love, and some you will consistently¬†struggle with.

— Kate

the internet is coming to get us. well let's get it before it gets us.

Six Months On: Things I’ve Learned

So I’ve been here for over six months now, and I’d like to think I’ve learned something from this experience besides just educational material. Over the last week I’ve been thinking about the little things learned, and have created a running list. Some of these things might be particular to living in Leicester, and some are just from life experiences as a 25 year old. These are generally things I would like to post on here, but didn’t really take up enough space to warrant an entire blog post. In no particular order, I give you 50 of my probably odd observations since moving here.

  1. It’s warmer in England after it’s rained¬†or about¬†to rain. The clouds really do keep the warmth in during the colder months.
  2. If you aren’t being teased by those around you on a daily basis, you aren’t really friends. If they’re being super¬†polite, you’ve done something terribly wrong.
  3. Sunlight is your friend. You will become like a cat, lazing about in any sunbeams you can find or crossing the street to walk on the sunny bit.
  4. You don’t realise how lazy you are until you don’t have a car.
  5. Hugs are important.
  6. Good shoes are worth the cost when you’ve walked through three cheap pairs in three months. Your pinky toes will thank you as well.
  7. Jackets and coats with good hoods are far superior to umbrellas.
  8. You will not find American levels of enthusiasm in shops and restaurants and when you do, you should be alarmed.
  9. Make an effort to blend in to the culture, but don’t try to fit in. You will always be marked as an other.
  10. Enunciate! You may think a standard American accent is very easy to understand, but many will argue with you on that. Be prepared to use different terms to get a point across.
  11. Don’t bother explaining you aren’t a tourist and actually live in the country right now. Nobody will believe you or particularly care.
  12. Buying domestic stamps while American confuses the post office staff most of the time. Why are you sending letters and cards from one English city to another?
  13. Everyone will always assume you need to have football specified as soccer in every conversation.
  14. You will still try to say pants, fries, and chips on occasion, even when you know better.
  15. Everyone will assume as an American that you understand all of English social norms. You will not. Be prepared to get exasperated expressions and sighs.
  16. Try any food offered to you at least once.
  17. Once weaned off ultra processed American foods, your stomach will try to stage a revolt when you try to eat anything similar again. Also, you really will feel better.
  18. You will still learn and/or teach country-specific idioms to each other, even six months on.
  19. Taxis will always try to take you on the most circuitous route possible. You will have to sometimes give directions to remind them that you do, in fact, live here.
  20. If you lived in a lot of states growing up, pick your favourite and stick to it. You will be asked which state you are from on a regular basis. Or give a different one each time.
  21. No one will know where your state is unless it’s New York, Texas, Florida, or California. Even then, do not expect them to know where the city is located in the state.
  22. Generally no one will be so rude as to throw US stereotypes at you, though perhaps when they think you aren’t listening or don’t know you’re American yet. However, the stereotypes, while abrasive at times, are generally pretty accurate. If they don’t directly apply to you, then someone you personally know probably does fit the bill.
  23. English essay styles are not the same as in the states. Get an English proofreader to help you.
  24. Do not try to keep pace drinking with the locals. You will lose.
  25. When asked to say an “American” word, fanny pack always makes people laugh.
  26. The people here (excluding the suits) generally don’t dress smarter per se, as much as they don’t wear many jeans.
  27. The locals will not care as much about Roman ruins as you will. These are just a fact of life for them.
  28. Portable USB chargers are a godsend and you should always have one on you if you have a smartphone.
  29. From what I can guess, anything under 65 F (18 C) is too cold and anything over 85 F (29 C) is too hot.
  30. People will look at you with pity if you are outside in less than 18 C without a coat. The look will turn to confusion when they see you have sandals on.
  31. The only strangers that will come up and randomly talk to you are as follows: sweet old ladies, crazy people, people working in public service (ticket inspectors, community support), panhandlers, and drunks.
  32. Drunk English behave like sober Americans in terms of friendliness.
  33. What constitutes a long drive is very dependant on where you live.
  34. Trust nothing when someone says they’re cooking something. It’s probably not what you’re expecting, though it will probably be delicious.
  35. If you don’t specify, asking for a brand¬†of alcoholic beverage will get you a full pint. You have to ask for a half pint to get one.
  36. You will become oddly defensive about places and things that you would be mocking back at home. It’s like the little brother syndrome – “only I get to tease my little brother, not you!”
  37. The US is so deprived of cheese varieties.
  38. The locals will not understand your reasoning or logic in what you take photos of.
  39. There are such things as urban foxes and you will always be excited to see one in real life.
  40. Hedgehogs are as cute as you hope they will be, rooting around in the front garden.
  41. Hang drying clothes is a way of life, even when you have access to a dryer.
  42. There are no paper towels in the public bathrooms. There are also no electrical plugs in the private bathrooms besides a special one for electric razors.
  43. There are no screens on windows. You open the windows and you will get insects in the house. On the upside, mosquitos are next to nonexistent. On the downside, wasps are not.
  44. You will get x’s at the end of texts and emails from SO’s, good friends, and family. Like, every single text and email. You will be asked why you aren’t sending them back. You will possibly upset someone with a lack or surplus of x’s. You will finally get used to it and then accidentally put them on texts and emails to people back in the US. They will be incredibly confused. The cycle will continue.
  45. There is something in this country that can make even the cheeriest people crack and grumble. I can’t place exactly what it is. Some people will fight the urge. Some will embrace it. It just is what it is.
  46. You will sometimes feel the urge to refuse to do something differently over silly things. Whether it’s because it’s not what you’re used to or just a shift into the later 20s, I’m not sure. However, you will find yourself in an argument over whether something is¬†really necessary to do a certain way. Be sure to apologise to these people when you realise it’s happening. They only mean the best.
  47. Calling people sir and ma’am here is generally met with horror. I’ve been told it’s far too formal. This will leave you in a bit of a lurch if you forget someone’s name or are being introduced to someone who is your social superior. Just surround yourself with doctors and professors. Those titles never seem to be frowned upon for using.
  48. I remain convinced that there are towns where half the roads are just roundabouts. Whilst horrifying at first, you start to see the logic of them after a while. You’ll also realise one day that you have started looking left-right-left before crossing traffic instead of right-left-right. You won’t be able to pinpoint when this started.
  49. Even when you comfortably know how to use them in sentences, you will always feel weird using expressly British terms like bloody, posh, or naff.
  50. You will at some point begin to apologise to inanimate objects and to people who were obviously the ones in the wrong. Just like when you shift looking before crossing the road, you won’t know when this started.

get off my doorstep we're not in america. there's nothing wrong with adopting a bit of american culture. All right get off my doorstep or i'll shoot you.


It’s All About the Mentality

Something that you will probably not¬†consider too seriously (but totally should) when studying abroad is what you plan to do with yourself afterwards. After being here a few months I’ve realised that there are three main branches to this – the Education First, the Tourist, and the Not Leaving branches. These are of course geared towards non-EU students doing their entire degree abroad and not study abroad, as it’s all much different and sometimes easier if your country is a part of the European Union. It’s important you figure out early on which one you are, especially if you’re on a limited budget, so you know how to make the best of your year. Let me explain through broad, sweeping stereotypes of the groups.

The Education First

The Education First¬†is at this university because it was the best option for their career choices. They can love, hate, or be indifferent towards this new country because they already have a goal workplace in mind (or lined up¬†for them if they’re lucky). This person will go to events and see cultural attractions if it’s reasonable or doesn’t upend their workload, because their priority is first and foremost towards their education. Depending on the situation, they’ll go home for the long holiday periods and may go home for their dissertation if it’s economically feasible. This student will likely be the one with the smallest sum of student loans, because they’ve been planning in the long term what they want to do with their life.

The Tourist

The Tourist is likely planning on going back to their home country after their degree, but they may try for a job in their host country. Regardless, they aren’t entirely sure when they’ll be back in this new country and want to see and do as much as they can with this definite period of time. They will be travelling to see new cities every other weekend and out on the town as much as they can. They’ll likely try to make as many friends (and memories) as possible because this is a liminal year and should be lived to the fullest. This student¬†will want to save up as much money as possible beforehand and be chill about cheap accomodation and odd hours for inexpensive¬†transport options.

The Not Leaving

The Not Leaving is¬†decently versed in visa regulations and is determined to become one of the limited accepted immigrants into their new country when their degree is done. They will likely be jockeying for anything to tack on their CVs that will make them stand out and will (like the Education First) be hesistant to going out on many¬†adventures across the country. It’s not that they don’t want to go, but they see it as something to be visited later when they’ve got jobs and instead save the money for the few months post-degree that they’ll be applying for work before the student visa runs up. These students will want to save up money like the Tourist, but hoard it for the costs that trying to stay inevitably drag up.

When it comes down to it, most people in this experience won’t know for sure what they want to do until they’re already here. I know there are some folks in my programme that definitely started in one group and have migrated to another, and there are others who came here knowing exactly what they intended to do and are sticking to it. And you know what? That’s awesome either way. It’s just something you need to stop and think about when you decide to do your higher education in another country, and something to consider of the friends you make while you’re there. I know I haven’t gone on as many trips and events as some of the people in my group, and I only hope they don’t think I’m horribly antisocial, just maybe taking a different mentality of my time here. Or maybe that I’m just perpetually broke being a student on student loans. :p

— Kate


turns out meeting new people is a lot more complicated than I'd originally thought