Camping – in Tents!

So after Lyme Regis we literally came home, unpacked, did some laundry, repacked, then headed out the next day. The weather was a bit concerningly grey, but we carried on with high hopes into the Suffolk countryside.

IMG_4522M and I had debated what our plans would be if we ended up with fellow campers right next to our pitch, but it ended up being entirely academic. There were a few folks in the cabins nearby, but we were the only ones camping in a tent in the entire section. Apparently the camping season doesn’t really start at the beginning of May as we were soon to see, but no matter – no queues to use the bathrooms in the mornings!

The sun was starting to hide behind some grey clouds, so we put the tent together as quickly as possible. This being our first time putting the tent together, it took about twice as long as the booklet suggested and we may have forgotten to put some bits and bobs in the right areas. Meh, nothing died. Eventually though, we had a tent with an airbed and all our kit for the next 3 nights. This called for a trip to the nearby village for BBQ supplies.

We came back about an hour later with a comical amount of meat and gave the new collapsible BBQ a go. For a little thing from Sainsbury’s, it was really impressive! With meat a-cooking, we had a good first night until the sun set.

With sunset came a wickedly cold wind and an impressive temperature drop. When the jacket, coat, and blanket bundle wasn’t cutting it, a trip to the nearby pub was in order to defrost a bit. The Star Inn ended up being really nice, so we booked a table for dinner there the next night.

The next morning the two of us awoke, cracked the ice off our sleeping bags (I kid, I kid.), and got ready for the day. We discovered that our gas cooker really doesn’t like high winds and had to give up on some perfectly good sausages for breakfast. Had some thick bread from the supplies instead, then cracked on for Southwold.

IMG_4545
Choppy waters when we went.

Southwold is on the coast and is about 30 miles east of Ipswich. It’s an old town, with records of it in the Domesday Book, though the town has shifted and changed a goodly bit since. In 1659 a massive fire swept through and destroyed a large portion of buildings. Some of these sites were never rebuilt upon and have become little greens around the town. There are still plaques that mark these.

Nowadays Southwold is mostly a beachside resort town, with nearly half of the homes there for holiday rentals. Other than tourists, they are also the site of Adnams Brewery – who are the largest single employer in the area. We popped into the shop of the brewery, but didn’t have a booking for the tour. Maybe some other time. Instead, we walked down the pier into the angry ocean. The weather may not have been fantastic, but the off the wall show we found definitely made the walk worth it.

As the rain got worse in Southwold, we thought it best to travel back inland to our tent. The rain did not follow thankfully, and after a short nap we walked over to the pub again to enjoy a nice warm dinner. It did not disappoint! The pub seemed to be having a community night whilst we were there. There was a jumble sale in the back room and a sewing group having drinks in the front while somebody played a random assortment of tunes from his many vinyls near the entranceway.

It was at this point that one of my Twitter friends asked if you could camp at pubs. Well, maybe not at this one, but you definitely can at others. Something to consider when in England I suppose.

IMG_4540
A very determined M heading for food.

The next day we got back in the car after breakfast and drove out to Sutton Hoo. I may have badgered M a bit for this one, as it was geeky archaeology, but he did get some ice cream out of it.

Sutton Hoo is the site of an Anglo-Saxon cemetery. What makes it special is that in the 1930s they managed to find an undisturbed ship burial containing a wealth of artefacts. Not only were the artefacts outstanding in their own right though, but they also gave a lot of new information on the period of early English history. They suspect the person buried in the ship was none other than Raedwald, ruler of the East Angles, who was a powerful king and was a major player in bringing Christianity into England. The burial is often compared with the Old English poem Beowulf, and in the visitors centre they make plenty of comparisons in the artefacts found and the verses of the poem.

The only downside to Sutton Hoo is that nearly all of the artefacts found were donated to the British Museum. They’re all on display, so I’ll likely head down soon to have a look at the originals now that I know the context. In the meanwhile though, the centre did have very well done replicas that gave a feel for the level of wealth and prestige that the objects were meant to have at the time of the burial. The level of craftsmanship in the sword alone was incredible.

We made it back to the campsite in the late afternoon, had another nap, then headed over to the shops for a last BBQ dinner. (I blame these naps on the air mattress, which refused to stay inflated overnight.) It was a bit warmer, but the wind was still biting. After dinner, we ended up in the ‘living room’ area of our tent to escape it.

IMG_4605.jpgNothing says holiday quite like a beach, so we queued up some Death in Paradise and enjoyed our last chilly evening sheltered away from the elements.

Definitely learned our lesson on early spring camping, but I’d like to say we’ll do it again soon. Maybe again later this summer in August when the weather is most assuredly going to be warmer. Will have to see if the significant otter needs a bit of convincing though. All in all we made the best of the weather and now know how to make a makeshift wind break in order to cook breakfast sausages in a pinch. Also that I am rubbish at packing for the weather and should probably listen to my husband when he tells me I didn’t bring enough layers. Maybe. Anyway, it’s getting closer and closer to glorious summer days!

 

— Kate

Trip to Milan (Autumn 2016)

Shortly after moving in, we got word from my parents that Dad had a conference in Milan the week of my birthday and that Mom was thinking about going along too so she could visit Italy. We did some quick research and found that flights from London to Milan are relatively cheap, so booked it up and planned to meet up with them at the end of September! Time flew past and soon we were through customs, off the train, and walking into central Milan.

IMG_1387
Our base camp for the next few days.

The bit of the city we were in was relatively modern, but there was a wide array of history to be found in Milan during the week. M and I had arrived a day before Mom and Dad, so we had a little tour around the centre of the city to see what there was to see – without visiting all the touristy bits we knew Mom and Dad would want to come along to as well. We stumbled upon a statue of Leonardo da Vinci, whose famous Last Supper painting is in Milan. (We regretfully didn’t book tickets far enough in advance to see it. 😦 ) We also had a nice wander through the massive Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, which is one of the oldest shopping malls in the world. It’s named after the first king of the Kingdom of Italy and was built 1865 – 1877. It’s still actively in use today for the same purposes.

M and I called it a quiet night with just the two of us and waited to catch up with the parentals. The next day we went hunting for history with Mom (Dad was at his conference) and found a rather macabre church nearby that of COURSE we had to go see – the San Bernardino alle Ossa. The church itself is standard Catholic beauty, but the small side chapel is a whole other ball park. The chapel was originally built as an ossuary in 1210 when the nearby cemetery ran out of space. A church was attached in 1269, but the bones were left be until 1679 when it was transformed into a chapel and the bones collected over the years were used as decor in the Roccoco style. You have to ask to be taken to the chapel, but it is still open to visitors today.

From there we thought it might be best to take a trip back to the living, so we headed out for lunch and then left M at the hotel so Mom and I could check out our very first cat cafe. It was all you could hope for and more! The cats were all very sociable and we had little furry friends hanging out on the sofa with us as we drank tea and split a slice of cake. The staff have to give you a warning not to feed the kitties, but that was easy enough. Man, if I had a cat cafe within easy reach of me, I would definitely be there all the time. So much fun!

 

We spent the evening back in the Milano Navigli district where Mom and Dad were staying and all met back up for dinner at a Texas themed rib joint. (Hey, why not?) After dinner, we strolled around the canals and had a nice night outdoors. It’s a really trendy part of the city, and a great place to go in the evenings – though very popular, so book ahead.

IMG_1496

Bright and early the next morning, we dashed across town via the Metro system and made it to the train station just in time to catch a train to Switzerland. We’d heard Lugano was just as lovely as Lake Como and only half as busy, and Mom thought it’d be fun to check two countries off her list in one trip – so off we went! Mom and I were rather disappointed that they didn’t bother to check passports, as it meant no new stamps for us.

Still, Lugano proved to be exactly as gorgeous as everyone said it would be, and very quiet.

 

We mosey’ed about for the afternoon, had lunch, and then climbed back up the side of the foothills to the train station to go back to Milan. Went out for dinner, then got the parents into an intense round of Pandemic back at their hotel. If you haven’t played this board game, you really should give it a try. You can play with 2-4 people, so it’s great for couples or groups. There’s also a ton of expansion packs, so you always have something new to add to it. For this round though, we just went with the original so we could teach everyone. It was a good night. 🙂

The next day was my birthday, and a day Dad had off from the conference, so we went out to do all the touristy bits in the city that we’d been wanting to see. It wasn’t even breakfast before I was dragging people to look at some Renaissance era buildings that we walked past.

The big deal for the day though had to be the Duomo, or Milan Cathedral. This building took nearly 600 years to complete and is the largest church in Italy. The roof is open to tourists and allows a close up view of some of the beautiful architecture that would otherwise go unnoticed at such great heights. The view of the city at the top is nearly as breathtaking as the building itself.

 

Inside is a world of history. The construction began in 1386 with the demolition of older buildings on the site. Construction began quickly and already famous artwork was created for the site, including the tomb of Pope Martin V in 1424. In the 16th century the building was still not completed, but the Spanish domination of Milan put it to a standstill and made the cathedral usable in most respects. The next major works did not begin again until the 17th century. Due to this, the cathedral contains a wide array of styles bridging through the time periods. The cathedral was finally declared completed in 1965, even though there are still some uncarved blocked that are meant to be statues. Regardless, this is an impressive building, and it even contains the remains of not only a saint, but reputedly one of the Holy Nails from the Crucifixion of Christ.

The cathedral is not only the centre of Milan now, but apparently is on the spot of the centre of the Roman Mediolanum. A paleo-Christian basilica was discovered underneath the foundations of the current building that date to 355. You can still see and even walk into the remnants of the old octagonal baptistery.

Feet utterly aching from walking for hours, we took a breather and then all regrouped for birthday dinner at this hole in the wall place that looked authentic as all get out and proved to be utterly delicious. Let me spare you talking about all the food we had during this trip and just give it to you all at once. Good lord, I think I gained ten pounds, but it was all so good!

The morning dawned, and we were on our last day. Determined to go find something Roman whilst in Italy, I then dragged my beloved family across town to go look at the Roman Museum and nearby amphitheatre remains. Got my Roman fix, and got some bonus Etruscan artefacts in there as well. Score!

With that, M and I had to head out before Mom and Dad did, so we all got in a ton of hugs and parted ways towards the airport. It was such a great trip being able to catch up with my family and see some history on the side! We flew back to the UK, which was significantly cooler than the Milan we left. We were coming through customs and I told the guard how glad I was to be home, with which his response was a gloriously sarcastic, “Well you say that now.”

Never change Britain.

 

— Kate

Touring Cambridge (Spring 2016)

In what is perhaps a running theme, M had a conference to go to and I’d not seen Cambridge, so I went along. The train out from Norwich was not overly remarkable, and the train station into Cambridge lets you out into a fairly modern bit of town. So far, I was not seeing the magic that everyone says is Cambridge. We dropped our bags off at the hotel and split up, and it was from there that I began to get a better idea of what people meant. My goal for the day was the Fitzwilliam Museum that I had heard so much about. On the way, I ran into a house that Darwin used to live in that seemed to merit a blue badge?

img_9908
For an entire year!

After a short bout of confusion and getting lost – a standard feature of leaving me alone in a city – I did find the museum. The Fitzwilliam is a stunning piece of architecture in the centre of Cambridge founded by the 7th Viscount FitzWilliam in 1816 and built in 1848. For such a magnificent looking building, they only receive about 470,000 visitors a year. I suppose you really go to London to see most artwork and history, but still. There is a lovely collection of Greco-Roman and Egyptian artefacts, so I was all on it. The museum also hit the news back in 2006 when 3 priceless porcelain vases in a window were accidentally destroyed by a tourist when he tripped and fell into them. The public at large thought that repairing them would be impossible, but after a year of painstaking work from the conservators at the museum, they were able to repair and restore the vases. Unsurprisingly, they are no longer housed in an open windowsill.

After my wander around the museum, my favourite human and I met back up and then headed out for dinner at the famous Eagle pub in town. It is one of the larger pubs in Cambridge and has been on site since 1667. In the back of the pub there is a bar with graffiti from WWII airmen covering the ceilings and walls, earning it the nickname of the RAF bar. Whilst this is pretty cool on its own, the most recent claim to fame goes back to the 28 February 1953. It was in The Eagle at lunchtime that day that Francis Crick and James Watson announced that they had discovered the structure of DNA. The pub serves a special ale in honour of this occasion, called Eagle’s DNA. When we went, they were in full dinner swing and we were absolutely stuffed into a corner table to manage a seat for food. It was really good fun though, and I’d definitely recommend popping by if you’re in the area sometime.

The next day we decided to have a wander around central Cambridge together and see all the famous colleges. Honestly, they truly are stunning. However, you cannot stop very long to take a photo before you are quickly swarmed by salespeople trying to sell you tours of the city or punting journeys on the river. It really does ruin the moment a bit, but unless you’re in the mood to constantly be barking “no” at someone, there’s not much you can do but snap a quick picture and scurry along.

All in all, I can see why people come to visit Cambridge, but I’m glad we only stayed 2 days. Unless you have business there, you’ll find you can see all the touristy bits pretty quickly. I’d definitely go back though, as there were a few more museums I didn’t get time to see. Maybe this year!

 

— Kate

 

‘Round and ‘Round and ‘Round She Goes

As per usual, I have disappeared off the face of the earth when it comes to blogging, and as per usual, I will catch you up with photos to tell the highlights of the last few weeks. We begin with the end, as my lectures have wrapped up and we put together our mock up exhibition case. With only £150 and a single car badge as our object, we put together what I’d like to think is a fabulous gallery case. It had its literal and figurative ups and downs, but it finished on a high note! 🙂

I now feel fairly well versed in a long-defunct car company, let me tell you.
Save money – the Clyno way!

The next day after our “opening night” of all the teams’ cases, I had to go down to London to speak with St. Paul’s Cathedral about my possible internship this summer with them. I got the placement!! 😀 I’d love to have photos up for you, but as it’s an active cathedral you aren’t supposed to take photographs indoors. That and the day I was in was an important blessing day for the guilds of London and it was jam-packed with official people in fancy attire. Let me just say that it is going to be SUCH a great summer and I’m looking forward to turning in my dissertation so I can get on to the internship. 🙂

Tickets to London don’t always come cheap, so I spent the day with a friend roaming the streets of London and visiting some museums we hadn’t been to yet. Had a Chipotle burrito for the first time (yes, I had to leave the country they come from to try one), then went to the Hunterian Museum. I would not recommend doing this in that particular order, as the Hunterian is almost entirely animal and human bits and pieces suspended in alcohol. I have no photos because it just felt kind of wrong to take pictures of most of it. If you’ve got any interest in anatomy or the human body though, it’s a free visit and definitely worth the time. If I’d known ahead of time, I would have brought my medically inclined one to come explain some of the diseases in more depth than the museum had.

After the Hunterian, we popped over to the Cider Tap by Euston Station. There are two guardhouses on either side of one of the entrances to Euston, and one sells only craft beer while the other only sells craft cider. It’s good fun and we needed a drink and a chance to rest our feet a bit. After a pint, we visited the Wellcome Collection. (We didn’t intend to make the day a medical museum day, but it kinda happened after we saw the £17 entrance fee for the Transport Museum.) Most of this museum you cannot photograph as well, so I only got a few, but I’d definitely go back. We only had an hour and a half to see the place, but you could easily spend 3 hours in there. The collections rotate, but for our visit they had Forensics, The Institute of Sexology, Genomes, and Modern Medicine. This is another free museum, and right down the road from the British Museum if you want a change of pace.

Back home in Leicester, King Richard III was finally reburied. The city went MAD with Richard decor. A couple weeks on and they’re still peeling Richard themed things off posterboards and signs. God knows Leicester could use the tourism though. For a city this size, a lot of people don’t realise it even exists, and it’s really a shame.

While the festivities for Richard III were still going on, I took a break from my research to finally visit Jewry Wall Museum, just a quick 10 minute walk from my building. Jewry Wall is kind of a misnomer for the place, as it was actually the Roman bathhouse when Leicester was under Roman rule. Most of the building has been carted off over the years to build other structures, such as St. Nicholas’s Church behind it. Parts of it have been visible its entire existance, but the underground structure of the building and the underfloor heating portions were buried and only rediscovered in the 1930s, oddly enough when they were digging to put a community pool in. Needless to say, the pool did not happen. The museum obviously doesn’t get much money, but they’ve got really great artefacts and the staff were some of the friendliest I’ve ever met. It’s a free visit, but toss a pound or two in the donation box. 🙂

The week before Easter four of us all chipped in for a private box at the Royal Opera House in London to see Swan Lake, and we were not disappointed! If you ever get the chance to see something performed there, take it immediately. Though try to not be in a rush to get on the Tube afterwards. That was a whole new level of chaos and shoving.

Over Easter break I got to spend time in lovely Wiltshire again, so we took the opportunity to go to Avebury and let the little one go Easter egg hunting while M and I wandered around the Avebury henge. This stone circle is vastly larger than Stonehenge, and you can get right into it – even touching the stones! I’ve still not been to Stonehenge, but I’ve been told by a lot of the locals that this was the better option of the two anyway. I definitely came away highly impressed.

Finally, on our last day in Wiltshire, we took advantage of the perfect weather and went to spend the afternoon in Bath. As it was a last minute decision, we didn’t have tickets to see the Roman baths yet again, but the city is so pretty that you can easily just enjoy the view and have a nice walk around town for a few hours and be completely content with it. We also tried a microbrewery in town this time, which had some appropriately Roman named brews. I can vouch that the Brutus is indeed delicious.

So there we are. I’m now back in Leicester for a little bit and working on my dissertation all week. It’s funny when you’ve finally got all the open time in the world that you’re not going anywhere exciting, but I’ll try to remedy this as soon and often as time will allow. 🙂

— Kate

Rugby and Ruins

Hello again!

I’m starting back up in lectures again, and so I’m also starting back up in blogging too! As promised last weekend, this will be a story about rugby and the Museum of London. Let us begin…

I am somewhat familiar with rugby, as I once tried out and briefly trained with the women’s rugby team at my high school. I quickly found out in just the training that I wasn’t cut out for it and my mother silently thanked the heavens for saving my teeth. 😛 However, that was also nearly 10 years ago, so what little I knew was pretty rusty. We’ve seen the university rugby teams around town this year, but all I’ve learned from them is that they’re like the UK equivalent of a fraternity in the hijinks they get into. We most recently saw them come into a pub dressed as a walking nativity scene (and that’s one of the tamer evenings).

So when I was offered the chance to come along to a proper rugby match here in Leicester, I was a total noob but totally excited to go. And it was well worth the chilly weather and wet seats to go! Leicester were up against their rival Bath, and Leicester came out with a fantastic 17-8 finish. At this point, I was hoping to find a great YouTube video to give a better explanation of the game than I would mumble out, but it appears that no one has made such a video yet. Instead, I will send you to WikiHow who can explain the basics without mucking it up like I inevitably will. Basically, I’m still lost at times, but I will definitely be going back to another game. I find it to be much more engaging than American football!

Later in the week, I also got a day to go and visit the Museum of London and I must recommend a visit if you’ve got some time to spare in the city! The museum is actually in the square mile of the City of London and has managed to be built both beside and IN a roundabout. It can prove a challenge to get inside, but once in it’s pretty darn cool. They’ve been tasked with telling the history of the city from before it was known as London to the modern era, and they’ve got a plethora of artefacts all the way through. If you look for it though, you can see which collections are their largest and which have likely been siphoned off to other museums in the area. The prehistoric section and semi-modern eras of London are well represented, but the Roman era sees a lot of (well done) reproductions and the plague era is skipped over almost entirely.

However, the Museum of London is fascinating with their collection of human remains – the largest in the UK! In nearly every exhibit they seem to have a skull that tells the human story of the era. There have been many facial reconstructions and explanations of how archaeologists have discovered much more about the past through them. In the sections lacking in original artefacts, these human remains and excellent reproductions (both 1:1 ratios and miniatures) of rooms and buildings of the time help keep their visitors engaged. It’s free to visit and right off of the Barbican Tube stop, so pop by if you’re near.

Anyhow, that’s all for now folks! I’ll talk to you later. 🙂

— Kate