Almost Christmas!

I’ve gotten my yearly reminder that my website renewal is up, and it finally guilted me into coming back to write again. Blogging on the regular is harder than you would think y’all. So what’s been going on around here since?

Well, Storm Ophelia came across the British Isles. Absolutely ravished poor Ireland, tearing roofs off of buildings and sending in gigantic waves. It brought us a lot of rain and winds, but nothing like there. The main feature that stood out was the creepy yellow sky that coloured England for a few hours over lunch. The photos I took didn’t do it any justice, but it looked like something from a doomsday scenario. Of course, science will always explain the magic, and it turned out to be sands swept up from the Sahara Desert that the storm’s winds carried all the way up to England, obscuring the view of the sun. A lot of folks on Twitter that were familiar with sandstorms said it looked exactly the same as they remember.

It was a good thing we survived Doomsday, as soon after was the arrival of our new nephew! He came into the world with all ten fingers, all ten toes, and the sweetest little face. ūüôā Everyone in the new little family is healthy and home now, though perhaps with a bit less sleep these days. I’m looking forward to seeing them all again this week!

October came to an end, and with it my obligations to sobriety. By the end of the month, I managed to raise ¬£175 for cancer support, and we celebrated November 1st with a bottle of champagne. (I would say I had a drink at 12:01, but let’s be real, I’m old now. It was the next evening.) It also helped soothe the pain of my failed driving theory test on the 31st. I missed by ONE POINT.

We managed okay though, with a chill staycation in Essex the next week. Saw the coast, rode some tiny trains, tried some new pubs – it was like Spain without the sunshine or Spanish language. Catching up on sleep though – that was ace.

Came back to the real world again and straight into another conference. This time, it was to the British Museum for the first 3D conference they’ve held. It was a wide variety from arts to sciences, tiny to massive scales. Saw some folks I’ve gotten to know over the year, and met some new ones that were pretty darn cool.

Back into the daily grind, it’s been all hands on deck at work. Something about the magic of Christmas means everyone needs to get things wrapped up or begun before we all disappear for the holidays. It’s been good though. It’s nice to be busy and useful! When possible, I was cramming in more studying for this next driving test. Nothing says cool kid like reading a theory test study guide at lunch break. After failing the last driving theory test, M booked the next one on a weekend straight away, and it turns out the second time was the charm! We celebrated by going home and going back to sleep after an 8 AM pass.

Before you know it, it was the end of November. My parents enjoyed being empty nesters by going to Las Vegas for Thanksgiving, and as usual we held our feast the Saturday after. This time around, our warnings were heeded and our guests came properly hungry. Everyone still had to be rolled to the sofa afterwards, but it was a definite success.

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The next few weekends had been booked full. We went up to Leeds again to catch up with friends and got to witness the Leeds Christmas Festival in all of its German Market glory. Hopped about the city centre at various bits of nightlife, and even ended up in an old industrial mill that’s been turned into a bit of an events place. That evening it happened to be an Apres Ski theme.

The next weekend was not quite so exciting. Well, maybe snow is exciting for some, but not when you used to live in what felt like Snow Central. Yes, it snowed in England. And properly this time. It started snowing in the night on Saturday and continued nearly all day on Sunday. Not only did it snow heavily, but it didn’t melt. And then it started snowing again on Monday. All the while, I sniffled and coughed on the sofa with a steadily worsening cold. Of which I then passed on to M by Tuesday. I don’t know what’s up with this year’s variety of cold, but it is akin to the flu in severity. You only really get to miss the aches and constant fever sweats. Wash yo hands ladies and gents.

On the brighter side of things, the snow finally melted away completely today, the two of us seem to be functional (if coughing) humans, and in a new Christmas record all the gifts are wrapped by the 17th. So there we are, caught back up on life and the universe. I’ve got ideas and plans for this blog in the coming year, and of course would always welcome ideas from the peanut gallery. Chat more later?

 

— Kate

 

Easter 2017

It was so nearly summer weather for Easter, but it was apparently not to be as we were soon back to sunny but chilly. Hey, beats rainy and chilly at least.

Started my long Easter weekend with a much deserved lie in, but only for so long. Significant otter was in a FitBit Workweek Hustle with myself and friends. He had no chance of catching up with me, but was neck and neck with my favourite Caffeinated Social Worker and determined not to take third place. This meant, of course, that we were about to go on a forced march around town. And march we did, through nearly every department store in the city centre, and around the gardens of the cathedral. (She noticed and just started walking more when she woke up.) Wrapped up the evening with a chilly BBQ and Star Wars VII.

The next day was more driving and less walking. Roamed the grocery store aimlessly in search of Easter roast and settled on a gammon. Wandered the carpet store doing pricing to determine if it’s worth having an external company do all the flooring in the new house – spoiler – not really. Came home and watched the most recent Star Wars. God, no one told me how awful that was.

Easter proper rolled in the next day and we had a quiet day of it – calling family, going for a nice walk around the nearby park, and having an Easter feast to ourselves. (The leftovers fed M for the rest of the week in sandwiches alone.) And of course, we tucked into the copious amounts of chocolate available.

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Finally, our last day of the long weekend came due, and it just seemed a bit morose. Poor M had to start nights that night, so we couldn’t really go anywhere or do anything major. Probably for the best, as I managed to fall down our stairs taking some water glasses to the kitchen and then promptly whined the rest of the day about how I was dying.

It was good to have a few days off work, and wonderful to spend some quality time with the spouse, but it just felt really odd not getting together with any family for Easter. We’re planning a trip out for M’s birth-week though, so that will help. I dunno, maybe it was just the tantalisingly-close-to-warm weather that was doing us both in, but I suspect our upcoming holiday will help. ūüôā

— Kate

 

 

Touring Cambridge (Spring 2016)

In what is perhaps a running theme, M had a conference to go to and I’d not seen Cambridge, so I went along. The train out from Norwich was not overly remarkable, and the train station into Cambridge lets you out into a fairly modern bit of town. So far, I was not seeing the magic that everyone says is Cambridge. We dropped our bags off at the hotel and split up, and it was from there that I began to get a better idea of what people meant. My goal for the day was the Fitzwilliam Museum that I had heard so much about. On the way, I ran into a house that Darwin used to live in that seemed to merit a blue badge?

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For an entire year!

After a short bout of confusion and getting lost – a standard feature of leaving me alone in a city – I did find the museum. The Fitzwilliam is a stunning piece of architecture in the centre of Cambridge founded by the 7th Viscount FitzWilliam in 1816 and built in 1848. For such a magnificent looking building, they only receive about 470,000 visitors a year. I suppose you really go to London to see most artwork and history, but still. There is a lovely collection of Greco-Roman and Egyptian artefacts, so I was all on it. The museum also hit the news back in 2006 when 3 priceless porcelain vases in a window were accidentally destroyed by a tourist when he tripped and fell into them. The public at large thought that repairing them would be impossible, but after a year of painstaking work from the conservators at the museum, they were able to repair and restore the vases. Unsurprisingly, they are no longer housed in an open windowsill.

After my wander around the museum, my favourite human and I met back up and then headed out for dinner at the famous Eagle pub in town. It is one of the larger pubs in Cambridge and has been on site since 1667. In the back of the pub there is a bar with graffiti from WWII airmen covering the ceilings and walls, earning it the nickname of the RAF bar. Whilst this is pretty cool on its own, the most recent claim to fame goes back to the 28 February 1953. It was in The Eagle at lunchtime that day that Francis Crick and James Watson announced that they had discovered the structure of DNA. The pub serves a special ale in honour of this occasion, called Eagle’s DNA. When we went, they were in full dinner swing and we were absolutely stuffed into a corner table to manage a seat for food. It was really good fun though, and I’d definitely recommend popping by if you’re in the area sometime.

The next day we decided to have a wander around central Cambridge together and see all the famous colleges. Honestly, they truly are stunning. However, you cannot stop very long to take a photo before you are quickly swarmed by salespeople trying to sell you tours of the city or punting journeys on the river. It really does ruin the moment a bit, but unless you’re in the mood to constantly be barking “no” at someone, there’s not much you can do but snap a quick picture and scurry along.

All in all, I can see why people come to visit Cambridge, but I’m glad we only stayed 2 days. Unless you have business there, you’ll find you can see all the touristy bits pretty quickly. I’d definitely go back though, as there were a few more museums I didn’t get time to see. Maybe this year!

 

— Kate

 

How To: Get Around With No Car

Getting around without a car in England was something I was looking forward to, coming from a town in the US where the nearest grocery store was 2 miles away and the main shopping area was close to 3. This however is entirely dependent on how close to (or in) a city you live, though even if you’re in the countryside you can get by with just buses and trains if located in the right spot. Even in the cityscape, you have 4 main options: buses, taxis, trains, and feet.

Buses

Buses in Leicester are next to useless if you live near the city centre, as all of the buses terminate in the centre. This means if I wanted to take the bus to university that I’d have to take one to the city centre (going the wrong way!) and then wait for another one to take me the correct direction towards the campus. If you time it right and don’t miss your connecting bus you’ll get in at … exactly the same time as if you had walked. Needless to say, I don’t bother with the buses in Leicester unless I’ve got arms full with grocery bags or am visiting a village on the outside of the city.

However, buses can be useful in other cities. The one in Colchester is useful for the days you really don’t want to climb up the steep hill to the High Street, and they have a few lines that run across the town. How convenient! The only major issue with this is that (in any town, not just Colchester) you need to know the name of the stop you’re getting off at before you get onto the bus so you can pay the right fare. There won’t always be information as to where each bus line goes, so be prepared to look up this information on your phone ahead of time or brave the possible wrath of a disgruntled bus driver and a queue full of people who would really like you to just not get on.

Taxis

Taxis, while not something I’d use on a daily basis, are not nearly as expensive as you would think, and are sometimes very much worth it. Coming home from the other side of town late at night or with a suitcase is well worth the ¬£6. You forget just how much you rely on your car until you don’t have one, as I have a time or two coming home late. If you can, call a private company in town as the famous black cabs are also generally the most expensive. They’re also the only ones that are legally allowed to be hailed off the street, so sometimes they’re worth it on that alone. It just depends on what you need. In this day and age it’s not so much an issue, but still make sure you’ve got cash on you for these rides just in case (and exact change if you’re going to use the bus!). Also be prepared to tip your driver. The tipping culture is much less extreme here than in the US, but there are still times when it is proper.

Trains

Trains I’ve spoken about before, so I’ll mostly just link you back to that entry. With that stated, trains are my main mode of long distance travel around the country. You can still have some trouble getting certain places though, especially if it’s a small village. You’ll need to prepare to catch a bus or get a ride from someone (or even hoof it) in these cases. This should be factored in to getting BACK to the train station too. Also worth noting is the power of the advance ticket. If you know for sure that you’ll be traveling on a certain day at a certain time, it’s well worth buying a ticket in advance. You can book them up to 12 weeks beforehand, and the sooner you do, the more likely you’ll get a great deal. Add in discounts for going at odd/off-peak hours and having a 16-25 railcard discount and it makes traveling much more feasible.

Feet

So you’re getting ready to go somewhere with no car. We’re going to say just in the city this time, as this is the day to day you’ll deal with. You need to become adept at knowing EXACTLY how long it takes to walk to get somewhere. Google Maps on my phone is generally pretty spot on for estimating walking times (24 minutes to campus!), but it’s always wise to pre-walk the path ahead of time or plan extra time to arrive somewhere when the timing is important. You also need to consider the importance that you will no longer have your car to act as a storage unit. You will become your own pack mule and either learn to travel light or develop new tone to muscles on your back and legs.

A good backpack is a must! At first I was hesistant and tried to get by with my crossbody messenger bag, but even the best of them can’t compete. It’s very common to see people with backpacks on though, even if they’re otherwise dressed really smart, so don’t worry about looking odd for it. Also, this should be a no-brainer, but make sure your bag is waterproof. Umbrellas don’t always cover your back side all the way and no one likes soggy papers or (god forbid) a wet laptop. Along this vein, make sure you either carry your lunch separately or be really confident in your food storage. You’ll always be in the worst spot when the broccoli juices leak out and there are rarely ever paper towels in the bathrooms here.

This bag logic will also inevitably spill over into your grocery bags. There are pros and cons to both though. When it comes to it, plastic bags:

  • Cut off blood circulation to your fingers, unless carrying very light items
  • Can’t be slid over the shoulder
  • Always have a chance of breaking due to weight strain or sharp object edges making holes (cereal boxes are notorious)
  • Bang your things around more, which could be devastating to your bananas and/or glass bottles
  • Some places make you pay for using them, to try to get you to be more eco-friendly

Reuseable bags are however:

  • Generally more comfortable (unless overstuffed and then they like to slide off your shoulders)
  • Fashionable or let you show off your favorite things/places (I’ve resisted the urge to pick up many reusable totes from the museums we’ve visited this year)
  • You have to remember to have one with you when you go out, which you sometimes won’t when you pick things up on the way home
  • Usually pretty good about not upsetting the self-checkout machines
  • Great for rescuing laundry, toting things to friends’, etc.

With this in mind, you’ll start changing your shopping habits a bit. The giant hauls of food don’t happen so often when you realise you have to carry it back. It also helps curb any therapy shopping too when you have to lug it all around town and back home. In general though you’ll just be walking around more, so it won’t feel like much. You just kinda learn to plan your life around it. You get in the habit of walking home with people or calling people up to make the walk pleasant, which is really nice. You can also plug in and tune out with music or podcasts. Regardless, you’ll adapt quickly and if you wear a pedometer you’ll find that reaching those healthy 10,000 steps a day is actually pretty easy to do. You’ll also find that you can in fact walk your bum off, but that it makes finding jeans SO much simpler.

In short, while having a car is¬†really nice and I do miss it on occasion, getting by on foot is entirely doable in Leicester and I love it. At this point I wouldn’t want to drive on a daily basis. Anyhow, it’s getting close to dinnertime and I should probably go find something to cook. Talk to y’all later!

— Kate

ministry of silly walks

Well, that was unexpected.

i think it's fabulous. every value i've ever held has been questioned and i'm loving it.

There are things to expect when you move to the UK, and a lot of the things (as an American) are either similar or have been warned about in advance. This still did not make it any easier to translate the weather from C to F for the first few weeks, but at least there was warning. However, there have also been things that no one thought to tell me about before coming over. Not always huge things, and at this point it mostly just gets a raised eyebrow and a “well that’s interesting” response, but I thought I’d share some of the ones that come to mind in list form for a change.

The ‘meh’ attitude

I was somewhat warned about this phenomena beforehand, but it’s interesting to experience. It’s likely that I’m just used to the over-exuberant nature of Americans, but it seems like the overarching theme of life in England is ‘meh.’ Not a depressed ‘meh’ or an apathetic ‘meh,’ but almost like a kind of stoicism. Your food came out wrong at the restaurant? Meh, it’s not bad enough to cause a fuss.¬†Come home to a flooded kitchen? Meh, it’s just a bit of water. I’ve heard some people chalk it up to the war mentality of previous generations and others to the weather, but the exact cause remains elusive. Being around it long enough though does prove infectious. Is this good or bad? Meh, I dunno.

People don’t talk to you

This one absolutely killed me the first few weeks here until classes started. I was lucky enough to have made some wonderful friends at the international welcome week as well as having some locals to call up and talk to, but in those mid-day hours I was miserable. In the States it’s completely normal to chat with staff at businesses or¬†strangers waiting wherever you’re at in public, but here it’s almost taboo. My more socially awkward friends back in the US were excited to hear about this, but the thrill of being able to read your book in public undisturbed is quickly deadened when you realise it’s been three days and the last meaningful conversation you had was with a cat wandering the alley by the cathedral. However, sometimes you’ll get a conversation when people overhear you and realise you’re not from around here, which leads to…

People being excited about Americans

I WAS SO NOT READY FOR THIS. I was under the assumption that either A) Americans were common enough visitors as to be unexciting or B) Americans would be at least passively tolerated and possibly disliked. While I’m sure this is the case for some, it’s at least a weekly occurrence that someone will hear me or my fellow comrades¬†of the North American Alliance speak and ask if we’re American. This will then diverge into four typical responses:

Where are you from?

This is problematic as it seems a lot of us move states (or provinces for Canada!) much more often and further than people in the UK move around. This question is usually just answered with “From the US,” but a lot of times people want to know what state. Sometimes I’m from one state, sometimes another, and sometimes both. It’s pretty remarkable if people actually know where these states are. This will sometimes lead to:

Oh, I’ve been to…

It’s always New York, Florida, or California. ALWAYS. Some very few will have gone to other states, but they’ve also gone to one of the three. I am convinced this is why we get asked such entertaining questions, because the Brits are going to the three most extreme examples of the country and expecting this to be America as a whole. The flipside can be said for Americans going to London though, so I try to keep my dramatic sighs to a minimum.

Why are you HERE?

This one only happens in Leicester really. Granted, I got the same question all the time from Westerners¬†when I moved from the Eastern US¬†so I could see why this comes up. It’s not a glitzy city or super historically important for the most part, but Leicester is seriously underrated, even by the locals. There’s SO MUCH to the UK that avoids London completely. This then leaves me with the last response of:

*insert pick up line*

I will give kudos to people brave enough to try this one, but the lines I’ve overheard have been so cheesy. My favorites so far are the guy who tried to convince my friend he was a big deal because he knew someone who was on Downton Abbey, and the drunk ones standing outside between a McDonald’s and a pub that wanted to say how beautiful all American accents were and how they wanted to sing us Spice Girls songs. Never a dull night in Leicester ladies and gents.

The innuendos

On that vein… the innuendos. We remain convinced that nearly anything can and will become a sexual innuendo at some point. I’m not talking pervy people making sideways comments, but in-your-face jokes and puns everywhere. On BBC, on advertisements, in businesses… You name it, we’ve probably seen one. Personally, I find it to be hilarious and a refreshing change of pace from the Puritan legacy left on the US, but it’s definitely something to warn¬†people know about.

The weather

“But Kate, you knew that it was gonna be drizzly and wet all the time!” Wait wait, hear me out on this one. Yes, it does rain much more often than where I was, but that’s pretty easy to do. However, it’s not the dreariness that everyone goes on about. Actually it’s not bad at all. In Leicester, it’s pretty common to have it chuck down rain for about 10-15 minutes and then be fine to walk in. Most of the time it’s just fine with a hooded jacket and a scarf. The hair will curl or wave something fierce, but the only big difference is how early the sun sets in autumn and winter. This is still offset though with all the walking I do. I think I’m still getting more vitamin D than before. That brings me to…

Walking

Yeah, I knew I’d be walking a lot. I did the Google Maps from my flat around the city and figured it’d be at minimum two miles a day. What I didn’t expect was how far I could get just walking. Walking two miles back in the US¬†would¬†maybe get me to the nearest grocery store, but walking two miles here will get me from my flat to the university and back again with the entire city centre along the way and probably a good five grocery stores to stop at along the way. Walking anywhere doesn’t feel long at all either with everything so close together. It is AWESOME to be in this situation and it’s so hard to explain what it’s like in the ‘real’ United States to people here and why I’m so enthused about it. Interesting side note – I discovered after walking these 2-5 miles a day that one¬†can in fact walk their posterior¬†off. I am moderately devestated about the disappearance of my backside!

Walking with other people

Anarchy is alive and well in the UK and it’s seen best in trying to walk down a street. Back in the US the rule of thumb is “drive right, walk right” and when two people come up to each other walking in opposite directions they’ll usually both sway right to avoid each other. You might think “drive left, walk left” would hold here, but you would be wrong. It’s more like drive left, walk in the middle of the sidewalk and refuse to budge until either the very last second or not at all. If you don’t put on a serious game face you’re likely to be walked into a puddle, even if you’re the one carrying six plastic bags and you’re trying to walk through an empty-handed human wall moseying the other way. It’s brutal.

Taking pork to the next level

Americans¬†LOVE to talk about how much they love bacon, but the British have taken it to the next level. BLTs? BLTs are for the weak – just have a bacon butty. Think you know what pigs in a blanket are? Pssht. Pork products seem to try and sneak into a¬†meal almost every day. I’ve got some bacon and pork chops in my fridge as I type this. Being halal or kosher or vegeterian is a challenge here going out to eat, and I’m not sure how vegans manage it. From what I can gather there seems to be more of a push towards alternative food choices, but America needs to calm down the bacon claims.

Instant chocolate meltage

Unlike Hershey’s, the chocolate here is not coated with wax and will therefore begin to melt as soon as it comes into contact with the heat of your fingers. Plan accordingly or try to eat it from the wrapper.

Missing food I didn’t even really like

There was a long and enthusiastic gushing about Little Debbie snack cakes tonight as I’ve yet to see them anywhere around the city. Talking about the powdered sugar donuts that you’ll find in any US convience store was like describing opening Christmas presents. The¬†strangest¬†thing about this though – I’ve never been THAT big a fan of Little Debbie. Probably for the best really. Everyone knows when you leave for long enough you start craving missing items that you love. US Starbursts, Peter Pan crunchy peanut butter, and pumpkin pie are all things that I can get similar products to that will do in a pinch, but they¬†just aren’t the same. It gets weird though when I realise how excitedly I’m discussing Cheetos and ranch dressing, when I hardly ever wanted them when there was access to plenty. I guess it plays into that whole idea of wanting what you can’t have?

Anyhoo, that’s all the excitement you get for this week. Tune in next week as I finish week one of the more practical work of museums and start delving into readings for digital curatorship. ūüėČ

— Kate

Field Trips, Societies, and Frosted Waffles

Hello all!

It’s been another busy, quickly-gone-by week here in Leicester. Started officially with Monday, but Tuesday was my big day – a field trip to Sheffield to see the Weston Park Museum with the department! We all filed on to a double-decker coach bus and got a lovely view of the M1 traffic for part of it, and English countryside for the rest. I also learned the new time lapse feature of iOS 8 is not good for closeby hillside. Needless to say, that was a scraped video project on the way back.

The museum itself was a refreshing break from the lecture hall and the misting rain of the day, but it was definitely geared first and foremost towards children with adults as an afterthought. Why they haven’t just rebranded as a children’s museum confuses me, but I will refrain any judgment until I get a better feel of the museums in the UK. Learned some really neat things about both Sheffield’s ancient and more recent past, and the immersive exhibit sections were phenomenal. I really should have taken more photos!

When the coach pulled back into the city, the three of us living in the same building (Henceforth referred to as the North American Alliance as we’re from America and Canada respectively) stopped by Morrisons for supplies to make a Taco Tuesday happen. (It was amazing with Daniele cooking, obviously.)

I must go off on a tangent about Morrisons here in Leicester. It is MASSIVELY large. For my American friends, think of just the food section of a Walmart. It almost looks out of place in this area with its size. However, they’ve got a really good selection for the most part (I’ll write a piece just on groceries at some point. It’s fun.) and we even managed to find El Paso taco shells. Perhaps the biggest thrill of the trip though was finding electric mattress pads on sale. Of course, it’s since warmed back up dramatically, but it was misty and rainy and cold the few days before and it just sounded magical at the time. It’ll continue to be magical when the winter sets in for sure. You may be asking what an electric mattress pad is exactly – it goes under the fitted sheet but otherwise behaves entirely like an electric blanket. I actually prefer them as they radiate heat rather than scald on certain spots. (Can you tell I live an exciting life?)

Wednesday was a short day in lectures, with a quick group discussion about our trip to Sheffield. Other than that, I just paid rent (Ouch.) and ended up flaking out of the baking society meet up (pun very much intended) due to the gross weather outside. It was a soup and blanket kind of evening.

Thursday was a lively day. Met up for the Student/Staff Committee and am now a proud member for the year, which sounds promising. I didn’t have any classes for the day, so went out to see the Global Market being¬†set up in the city centre. Did a quick look through the maze of wonderful smelling pop-up tents and picked up some delicious Dutch frosted waffles on the way home. Yum!

The weather was kinder for extracurricular activities that evening, so a group of us museum studies students went to the Real Ale Society and had a fantastic night of it! (If you haven’t caught on yet, a society here is basically a university club in the US.) A bit skewed in favor of men, but tasty beer and a bunch of science-related fields meant that it was a good time. Was told at one point that one of the guys’ uncle was in Downton Abbey, but I have trouble believing this. Then again, they do only have so many celebrities… (American stereotype imposed there.)

Friday we got our results back from our practice essay and no one burst into tears, so I can only assume we all did okay. Definitely room for improvement, but the markers were all very specific in what to improve and were actually very constructive and not critical of it all. We also had our option module briefing, in which we were given eight options to pick from. We were told that it always balances out so that everyone seems to get into the option they wanted, but when they told us we needed to pick a backup option you could see some tension form in the room. I’m sure it’ll all be fine, but I think everyone will be sure to write some impassioned reasons as to why they need to be in a specific section in the short space given to us to do so. I know I did. ūüėČ

The weekend was uneventful for the most part. Finally settled on a topic for my next essay – the ethics of bodies being displayed in museums. Talk about some cosy reading in bed! Also went by the Global Market one last time before they closed for the weekend, and introduced my mom to online grocery shopping and delivery through Tesco. That’ll be arriving tomorrow night and I am SO EXCITED. Food gifts are some of the best gifts. ūüôā

Now this¬†week is off to a decent start with the bodies in museums lecture going on this morning. It’ll be a great springboard for working through my essay over this week. Other than that, it’s been a typical Monday. Will speak again later!

— Kate

Incoming!

I’ve made it in mostly one piece to town! All said and done, it took about 25 hours of travel from my parents’ front door¬†to getting my keys in Leicester. The problem with leaving a teeny tiny town like my folks’¬†is that although it has an airport, it consists only of puddle-jumper planes that get you to your next major airport. Generally, these flights¬†are not cheap when tacked on to an already existing flight schedule. Instead, I took the 4 hour bus ride¬†to the airport and flew out from there. The fast-track lane for security seems to be gaining traction, though why they sent me through it I don’t know, because I ended up having to go through the backscatter machine anyway. Yay for failing the metal detector? At least I didn’t have to take off my shoes, by god.

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Don’t have to fight for the charging point when you get in early.

Caffeinated and charged, I got on the plane with my window seat view. Oh yeeeeah. It was a pretty uneventful flight for the first leg, but the view was gorgeous. There’s nothing quite like the Rocky Mountain chain. Also, I’m not sure which airplane gods took pity on me, but the leg room was amazing. It almost felt wasted on my shortness.

 

Once in the second airport, I grabbed a sandwich as I was regretting not getting one beforehand and got to pay Starbucks $7 for a ham and swiss. Highway robbery! Waited around and charged up my phone some more and finally got on the long haul flight. I thought British Airways was actually flying this one, but it was American Airlines again. Not a bad flight, but the movie and TV choices were limited at best. Tossed and turned and maybe slept 3 hours of the 9 hour flight before giving up, utterly defeated by my seat.

(At this point, my phone had a fit and ate all my photos between the plane and the next morning. Sorry!) Once off the plane, you have to go through the UK Border checkpoint and it seems they’ve decided to try something new for the incoming students with our own special queue. If you are coming over as a student, be prepared to wait an hour or so in this special queue as the regular entrance queue¬†breezes past you. We all watched a few students get fed up waiting that then jumped into the regular queue and seemed to make it through, but the border guards were not people¬†that any of us wanted to cross so we stuck it out.

Out of the airport, it’s a very easy trip to Leicester. The Underground has stations at each terminal, so you just get on with your luggage and go. The train that terminates at Cockfosters (go on, get the giggles out) means you can get on and ride for about 15 stops to the King’s Cross/St Pancras exit and then come up into King’s Cross and walk across the street to St Pancras. From there it was a brief trip to the toilets to wash my now grey hands and then upstairs to the East Midlands trains.

The train ride was uneventful, but mostly because I kept falling asleep in my seat. Having a table seat was wasted on my sleepiness. Be sure you keep your train ticket with you when you’ve gotten past the barriers, because they’ll check it when you get moving! We pulled in to Leicester and I could see my tower building from the tracks, so myself and my two suitcases hopped off and started walking to the flat. Ahead of time I had made a Google Streetview/Maps note where I had screencapped major points along the way and then attached the directions to them, figuring it would save me from eating the data on the pay as you go SIM in the phone. This helped IMMENSELY. Unlike the US, there is not always a street name marker on every corner, not are they as visible. Don’t even ask about blocks – there are no such equivalents.

While it would seem logical that the tall buildings in town would make for good visual markers, they really aren’t that helpful. For whatever reason, when you’re down on the street you can’t always see the tall buildings until you are right up on them.

Anyway, I made it in, signed my paperwork (Thank you Katt!) and dragged myself up the elevator and straight into the shower. The place looked like a tornado came through with the suitcases basically flipped to find the shower stuff. Ahh, clean feels so good. After that, it was a quick run to the nearest shop (in this case Tesco) for the absolute bare basics. From there, I fought sleep until I ended up falling asleep with Skype open. (Sorry about that!)

So this morning, the world was not such an overwhelming thing with adequate sleep. Started off with a thick fog, but it was mostly gone and only cloudy by the time I left for the city centre. The humidity though… That will take some re-adjusting to. I’ve done it before, but it’s been a few years.

 

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Also saw some pithy little graffiti nearby.

From there I stopped into the Newarke Houses Museum, which is this awesome mixture of Elizabethan houses with history ranging from the 1500s to WWI. Will definitely have to go back sometime.

Getting hungry, I started to walk more into town. I ended up stopping at a McDonald’s out of curiosity and convenience, and the cheeseburger and fries/chips taste exactly the same. Once in town, there was plenty to see, and this is only a tiny bit of it!

I didn’t take many photos downtown as I was trying to get a feel for where places were, but I’ll try to on further trips. After all this, I had a stocked bag full of flat supplies so I walked on home. Apparently DMU is having a Con of some kind, because I ran into what can only be described as anime coming off the screen.

So here I am now, writing this up after walking past this silliness back to the flat. It’s late here now, and I’m exhausted, so I will speak again in the next few days! Hopefully will be on the right time zone soon enough.

 

— Kate