Almost Christmas!

I’ve gotten my yearly reminder that my website renewal is up, and it finally guilted me into coming back to write again. Blogging on the regular is harder than you would think y’all. So what’s been going on around here since?

Well, Storm Ophelia came across the British Isles. Absolutely ravished poor Ireland, tearing roofs off of buildings and sending in gigantic waves. It brought us a lot of rain and winds, but nothing like there. The main feature that stood out was the creepy yellow sky that coloured England for a few hours over lunch. The photos I took didn’t do it any justice, but it looked like something from a doomsday scenario. Of course, science will always explain the magic, and it turned out to be sands swept up from the Sahara Desert that the storm’s winds carried all the way up to England, obscuring the view of the sun. A lot of folks on Twitter that were familiar with sandstorms said it looked exactly the same as they remember.

It was a good thing we survived Doomsday, as soon after was the arrival of our new nephew! He came into the world with all ten fingers, all ten toes, and the sweetest little face. 🙂 Everyone in the new little family is healthy and home now, though perhaps with a bit less sleep these days. I’m looking forward to seeing them all again this week!

October came to an end, and with it my obligations to sobriety. By the end of the month, I managed to raise £175 for cancer support, and we celebrated November 1st with a bottle of champagne. (I would say I had a drink at 12:01, but let’s be real, I’m old now. It was the next evening.) It also helped soothe the pain of my failed driving theory test on the 31st. I missed by ONE POINT.

We managed okay though, with a chill staycation in Essex the next week. Saw the coast, rode some tiny trains, tried some new pubs – it was like Spain without the sunshine or Spanish language. Catching up on sleep though – that was ace.

Came back to the real world again and straight into another conference. This time, it was to the British Museum for the first 3D conference they’ve held. It was a wide variety from arts to sciences, tiny to massive scales. Saw some folks I’ve gotten to know over the year, and met some new ones that were pretty darn cool.

Back into the daily grind, it’s been all hands on deck at work. Something about the magic of Christmas means everyone needs to get things wrapped up or begun before we all disappear for the holidays. It’s been good though. It’s nice to be busy and useful! When possible, I was cramming in more studying for this next driving test. Nothing says cool kid like reading a theory test study guide at lunch break. After failing the last driving theory test, M booked the next one on a weekend straight away, and it turns out the second time was the charm! We celebrated by going home and going back to sleep after an 8 AM pass.

Before you know it, it was the end of November. My parents enjoyed being empty nesters by going to Las Vegas for Thanksgiving, and as usual we held our feast the Saturday after. This time around, our warnings were heeded and our guests came properly hungry. Everyone still had to be rolled to the sofa afterwards, but it was a definite success.

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The next few weekends had been booked full. We went up to Leeds again to catch up with friends and got to witness the Leeds Christmas Festival in all of its German Market glory. Hopped about the city centre at various bits of nightlife, and even ended up in an old industrial mill that’s been turned into a bit of an events place. That evening it happened to be an Apres Ski theme.

The next weekend was not quite so exciting. Well, maybe snow is exciting for some, but not when you used to live in what felt like Snow Central. Yes, it snowed in England. And properly this time. It started snowing in the night on Saturday and continued nearly all day on Sunday. Not only did it snow heavily, but it didn’t melt. And then it started snowing again on Monday. All the while, I sniffled and coughed on the sofa with a steadily worsening cold. Of which I then passed on to M by Tuesday. I don’t know what’s up with this year’s variety of cold, but it is akin to the flu in severity. You only really get to miss the aches and constant fever sweats. Wash yo hands ladies and gents.

On the brighter side of things, the snow finally melted away completely today, the two of us seem to be functional (if coughing) humans, and in a new Christmas record all the gifts are wrapped by the 17th. So there we are, caught back up on life and the universe. I’ve got ideas and plans for this blog in the coming year, and of course would always welcome ideas from the peanut gallery. Chat more later?

 

— Kate

 

Christmas 2016

Christmas snuck up much quicker this year. Suppose it helps being employed! However, M and I were quite pleased to have all the presents wrapped and accounted for BEFORE Christmas Eve. We were even packed up and ready to travel before strictly necessary. It was wild.

There were also all the Christmas parties in the world to go to during December. At least it felt like it. (Not a complain by the way!) So maybe that’s what made it feel like it was coming up so quickly. So many opportunities to wear my reindeer antler headband. Looking back, I can see why my jeans were so tight by New Year’s.

The husband had work until Christmas Eve, so we left the evening of and headed out to Tetbury. It was nothing short of miraculous that we managed to get our luggage, all the presents, and ourselves into the Little Red Mini, but it was accomplished!

It did make for a bit of a laugh when we finally arrived at the in-laws around midnight and added our presents to the pile. Seems everyone was feeling extra festive this year. After we got everything in the house, we snuck up to bed to get a few hours sleep before the youngest in the family woke up to Christmas magic. We almost made it until 7 am.

Gift opening took less time this year than last, but it was mostly due to a new opening system. That and everyone looked like they could use a nap before Christmas dinner. Post-present, post-nap, we all got dressed up nicely and came down for the Christmas feast. All the traditional foods were served, including the ever misunderstood Brussels sprouts.

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In case you wondered what they looked like in the wild.

Dinner concluded, the annual Christmas game began. It goes as thus – wrapped presents appear on the table. Everyone picks a number out of a bowl. Depending on the year, the person with the highest or lowest seems to go first. They pick a present, but don’t open it. The numbers go around with everyone picking a present in order. Then they’re all opened and the real game starts.

Unlike other varieties of this game that you will see, the family rule is that it continues until everyone is happy with their gift and no one else swaps for an entire round. This makes what could otherwise be a 20 minute game into a two hour event. Keep in mind, these are not high ticket items, but you’d be amazed the bargaining power of a cat head timer or a pack of wooden spoons. Bargaining and pleaded was completed, and we all headed to the living room for the evening.

The next day was Boxing Day. Tradition in this house is to do a cold cut spread, and this year it was EPIC. Keep in mind, there were twelve adults present, but there were still bits to nibble on the next morning.

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After two days in the house, M and I really needed to go for a walk, so we took a joy ride over to Cirencester and wandered the town. He ended up being dragged into the Corinium Museum to satisfy my never ending need to see old things along the way, but handled it admirably.

We did have a time frame to stick to though, as we were due at his aunt and uncle’s house for the belated Boxing Day party and (this year) murder mystery dinner!

After Boxing Day festivities, it all went quiet in the Cotswolds as we relished in that limbo period between Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve. Most of the family headed out to Manchester to celebrate the youngest’s birthday, but we stayed behind as M had to be back at work too soon to allow it.

He did however plan to meet up with his friend from Leeds, who was currently in the area visiting his family. He went out to pick him up from the nearby town and I hung around the house, figuring I’d give them some male bonding time. Little did we know just how long they’d be gone.

I never quite got the same story out of both of them, but from what I gather, they were about 3 miles away from the house with groceries in the back of the car when suddenly M either overcorrected or just didn’t see it, but managed to hit a pothole. I only wish I could see this pothole, because the damage it did not only shredded the tyre, but upset the wheel too.

So the boys got to sit on the side of the road for about 2 hours as one AA van came out and agreed that the tyre couldn’t be reinflated, then a tow truck followed along to get them back. When they got to the street, the truck couldn’t go down it, so they had to take the poor limping Mini off the back of it and slowly drive it to his parents’ house.

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The poor car. 😦

The next morning, we got to call every tyre place in the region to find someone who could not only replace a tyre, but also a wheel. In Christmas holidays.

Miraculously, one was found that didn’t cost an arm and a leg, and we headed out only a day later than intended. It’s not a holiday without something happening now is it? 😛

Thankfully, the journey home was uneventful and the overall festive period was much enjoyed!

 

— Kate

Christmastime in Kensington (Winter 2015)

So at this time I wasn’t working and the significant otter was due at a multi-day conference in London. It therefore stood to reason that if he was going to need to rent a hotel room for a night that I might as well come crash and have a wander whilst he was at work. He was centred around Westminster, but we ended up finding a nice place near Kensington, so I took it as a sign to go see a few of the things I’d been meaning to there.

I decided to try and skip the crowds and go to Kensington Palace first. Had a brisk walk across Kensington Gardens and right to the building itself. I have to be honest, it doesn’t look particularly palatial to me, but nice enough. Pretty majestic statue of Queen Victoria near the entrance to be certain.

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Kensington Palace may best be known for Queen Victoria, as she spent most of her childhood in it under a strict regime put in place by her mother. Though they’ve turned it into a beautiful museum area based on her entire lifetime, it was said that Victoria never really went back to the palace after she became queen. Regardless, it’s highly recommended to see if you’re a Victoria fan, especially after the recent show Victoria has aired. It’s a very intimate look at her personal and regal lives. I regret that I don’t have many photos from the exhibit, but they’ve got a lot of dark lighting for conservation purposes. Plus I was really just enjoying the experience of it all.

Of course, the palace wasn’t just built for Victoria. It was originally merely a Jacobean mansion built in the early 17th century by the First Earl of Nottingham and thusly called Nottingham House. It was when the joint monarchs William and Mary began to look for a healthier location to live for the unwell William that it was purchased and transformed into Kensington Palace. Sir Christopher Wren (the same architect who designed and built St Paul’s Cathedral) was put in charge of its expansion. In order to save on money and time, he kept the original mansion unchanged and added pavilion extensions at each of the corners. For the next 70 years, Kensington Palace was the favourite palace of residence for British monarchy. However, King George II allowed the palace to fall into disrepair after the death of his wife. After his death, the ascending King George III left the palace and it was only used for minor royalty after.

Next of course, were the Kensington Gardens. I had darted through them earlier through a chilly fog, but it has since lifted and exposed a lovely winter scene. Closer to the palace is the Sunken Garden, which was actually only planted in 1908. It was modelled on a similar garden at Hampton Court Palace downriver and follows 18th century ideals of gardening.

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Next was a walk through the wider gardens. Being December, the flowers were all gone, but it has a mystical feel about it, which is something to be admired in a garden in the centre of London. Be brave with any snacks you might eat here though, as the squirrels are so fearless that they have signs warning you of them. They’ll walk right up to you. This is a more recent phenomena, as through the Palace’s heyday the gardens were closed to the public except for Saturdays. Even then, only the ‘respectably dressed’ could come in. If you walk the gardens now, I can assure you that this is no longer enforced. Regardless of dress code, Kensington Gardens are well worth an afternoon stroll and you’ll have plenty of room to do so with over 240 acres! It was originally part of Hyde Park and is still right next to it, so one can easily cross between the two and not realise straight away.

At the edge of the parks if you’re heading towards the museums, you can’t miss the Albert Memorial across from the Royal Albert Hall. It was commissioned by Queen Victoria in memory of Prince Albert after his death in 1861. It was officially completed in 1875 and cost £120,000 at the time (approximately £10 million today). It is 176 feet tall and took over ten years to complete. It had fallen into disrepair over the century and in the late 1990s work began to restore the monument to its former glory. For 80 years the statue had been covered in black paint, which theories believe may have been an atmospheric pollution that destroyed the original gold leaf surface. Following the restoration, it is now recovered in new gold leaf.

 

Finally, finishing the Victorian tour I had accidentally set myself on, I went to see the Victoria & Albert Museum, just south of the gardens. The V&A is the world’s largest museum of decorative arts and designs from around the world and throughout 5,000 years of history. Normally I’m not a huge fan of art museums, but I will always make an exception for the V&A. It is just phenomenal. It was founded in 1852 and is (obviously) named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. The region it’s in has been coined as “Albertopolis” because of so many things in the region being associated with the Prince. Again, I didn’t take as many photos as I would have liked, but I was enjoying myself far too much. I’ll have to take more photos to share later.

 

After all this, I was exhausted and quite pleased to find my sweetheart and plop down in a pub. Managed a record pedometer tracking of 11.8 miles in the day. I perhaps wouldn’t recommend doing all of this in one go like I did unless you’ve got really good footwear and a good night’s sleep, but it was a really good day!

— Kate