No one woke me up when September ended!

But seriously, that Green Day song has been the bane of my birthday for YEARS now. Oddly enough, no one mentioned it this year. This was finally the year I was allowed to sleep through September ending. Wild. So, what’s been happening?

Well, for starters we have a new and furry family member in our house! Her name is Ophelia and she’s the prettiest kitty in Colchester. (Significant Otter will argue the prettiest ever.) She spent the first week in our house hiding behind the sofa, and the next two only hanging out with us when we were sitting. Nowadays, she goes where she pleases and loves hanging out with us. This does lead to some comedic moments, like this morning when she accidentally fell in the laundry basket and nearly destroyed it getting out. However, she came out unscathed and came to purr on M’s legs whilst he tried to sleep a little longer.

I’ve also been on a bit of a museum binge (Surprising, I know.) recently and been to some new ones. My colleague managed to score some tickets to the Bart’s Pathology Museum, which is only open a few times a year. It’s a room filled with jars of human bits and skeletal remains. Basically, it’s disgusting and fascinating in the same go, and each jar has a little blurb of information on it, so you could easily spend a lot longer than your allocated hour there. It was originally used by the university as a teaching collection, but now the room is only ever used for exams. M says he’s sat some there and was wholly unimpressed. I loved it. Unsurprisingly, they don’t let you take close up photos of the specimens, but you can take room-wide shots. The room itself is cool just for its architecture.

Next was a staff field trip to our satellite museum in Tring. Someone described it to us before going as a Dead Zoo, and that’s actually a pretty apt description. Not in a terrible way, but I wouldn’t go if you have issues with taxidermy. It’s a small museum, but absolutely stuffed to the gills with specimens, and really helpful and friendly staff. Tring is a bit out of the way, but it’s definitely worth a stop. We got a fascinating backstage tour of the collections, and saw more eggs and bird remains in one room than I’ve probably ever seen alive in one area. They’ve got one of the best and most diverse collections for each, so if you’re researching birds, you’ll likely end up in the little town of Tring.

After a museum binge, I had two different work trips through September. First was the ToScA 2017 meeting, in which I had to give a talk on my work with the blue whale. It was only slightly terrifying, and I think it ended up okay. Over the three days, I met a load of interesting new people, learned some new tips and tricks in the tomography world, heard some cool new work going on, and got to have dinner on the HMS Warrior – the first ironclad ship built in 1860!

Towards the end of the month, I got to fly on one of the few uncanceled RyanAir flights up to Edinburgh to attend a Standing Up for Science workshop. While there, I learned all about working with the media as a scientist and how best to get work across to someone who will inherently not know what the topic is on. It was a really handy course, and I met even more cool people in varied fields with some fascinating works. It was a good month for meeting people! Unfortunately, I didn’t have the time to wander Edinburgh as I’d hoped, and was on the last flight of the evening home for a weekend with the family.

Towards the end of September of course, is my birthday! I was working late on the actual day, but the Saturday morning M and I had a nice lie in and then wandered over to the nearby village of Coggeshall. It was such a cool place, with over 300 listed buildings and two National Trust sites. I spent the day blissfully looking at old things, and my beloved M came along for the ride, enjoying a scone with me in the garden of the Paycocke’s House and a pint of beer at the medieval pubs I had earmarked. We ended the adventures with dinner at one of the pubs, which had a steak so good that I think we would both gladly go back the 13 miles to have it again. The weather behaved, my gifts from everyone were fabulous, and it was all in all a really good day.

Sunday morning began October, and with it my Sober October challenge. I’ve signed up to be sober for the entire month in order to raise money for the cancer support charity Macmillan. It’s a great cause and a good reason to give up alcohol for the month. I suspect by the end of it I will be a bit healthier and Macmillan will have a bit more to put towards helping people whilst they fight cancer. I’ll be taking donations all month, alongside of sorry looking photos of me in pubs with friends and a soft drink in my hand, so if you feel charitable, donate a pint’s worth to the cause. ūüôā

And most recently, there was the car wreck outside of the Natural History Museum that had everyone in a tizzy. Turned out to be just a really bad taxi driver, and nobody had serious injuries. I wasn’t even at work when it happened as it was on a Saturday, and got woken up from a nap with my phone blowing up to ask if I’m okay. Grumpy yes, but okay. Honestly though, don’t let these things put you off coming to London. It’s a wild city with so much to offer. And if you want to see us here at the NHM, we’ve still got the Whales exhibition open where you can stand next to a flipper for a sense of perspective – and the ice rink will be opening soon!

All in all, it’s turning into a fine autumnal season. I’m looking forward to seeing what October will hold. ūüôā

 

— Kate

How To: Grocery Shopping

I was going to title this “The Tale of Two Tescos,” but I only managed to get a few photos of the second one before the security guard started trying to sneakily follow me around like I was going to steal something or take inappropriate photos. Anyway, I figured for the next few posts I’d do a few How To’s on everyday life here unless something major cropped up to otherwise fill blog space. A week or so ago I was put in contact with a sweet girl who needed some advice on how to get by in England as an American fresh off the plane and I realised I had quite a few stories to tell already that I wish people had told me when I arrived. With that in mind, let us begin!

First and foremost, let us dispel the idea that everything in England is tiny. Yes, the country is old and has been continuously occupied and expanded upon, but they’ve hardly reached peak capacity. There are still rolling green hills of countryside and they’re just as big fans of supermarkets as we are in the US. There are many varieties of grocery stores to go to, but the closest supermarket to me is Tesco, so that’s who you’re getting as an example today.

I’m in the city proper, so I can walk everywhere I need to go and the shops are not an exception. The big Tesco is about a half a mile from my place, so it’s only a 10 minute walk to get there. The only issue with this is it also means walking in the cold for half a mile each way, and one way is carrying back everything you bought. I’ll revisit this later though.

Carrying on, we’re just going to start at the front entrance.

I apologise, but it was freezing and I did not feel inclined to march across the car park to take a photo of the front straight on. If your curiosity is killing you, you can see it here on Google Maps, complete with loitering youths. Also, if you’re reading that sign you aren’t crazy – there are old laws here that restrict opening hours of certain businesses on Sundays and Tesco falls into that category. You run out of crisps at 6pm on a Sunday evening and you’re running to a convenience store. Be sure to¬†note that Click & Collect. I’ll get back to that.

When you walk inside you’ll quickly notice that it looks remarkably like a grocery store in the States. Ooo. Ahh.

Dueling Buggies
I didn’t intend to catch this moment of dueling buggies, but I think it makes the picture all the better.

Looking in to the fruit and veg, you’ll see that they’re all clearly labelled with expiry dates, but look closer… Where are they from?

This is when you realise that America is absolutely MASSIVE and that we can grow almost anything we want in our own country. You’d expect to find state names here. However, Britain is an island about the size of Oregon, so sometimes imports have to happen. You’ll find the locally grown food tends to say so in big, bold letters on the signs over the place they’re in (though not always, as this bag of apples indicates).

Honestly though, you’ll find a lot of the shop looks pretty much¬†identical, or at least in setups that you wouldn’t find particularly striking. I’m a big fan of this style of frozen food section actually. Less likely to be hit by a frozen pea bag avalanche in the bottom shelves.

Heck, even some of the food is exactly the same. Wait, did I move to a new country?

Activia, what are you doing here?
Activia, what are you doing here?

Eventually though, you will find things in containers you didn’t expect and in shelves you wouldn’t have looked on.

I have to say I really love the teeny tiny pints of milk. You may not be able to tell easily, but those little ones on the middle shelf are only a pint! If you’re not a milk fiend, it can be difficult to go through a 2 pint jug and next to impossible to manage a litre one. Even if you are a milk fiend like me, it goes off much quicker here than in the US, so it’s great to get just a little one and pick another up on the way home if need be on another day. (Short shelf life is a trend with all the food here. Seriously guys, what’s going into US food?) Also, the milk jugs are tall and narrow, which is a genius move and should be mandatory to start doing in the States immediately. Suddenly the amount of leftovers hidden behind the milk for days¬†drops by 90%.

And of course, the eggs. I could go on about why eggs are left unrefridgerated here, but I’ll link you to a more reliable source than my own word. You can put them in the fridge if you want to though, and if I have room I sometimes still do because it’s an odd sight to see eggs in the pantry. …And I’m afraid of knocking them over with a box of cereal, but that’s another matter entirely.

There are also a few things which just don’t come to the States, but are fantastic and should market themselves overseas. There are all the fun chocolates and biscuits and Yorkshire puddings of course, but man oh man do you need to try the squash.

SO MANY OPTIONS.
SO MANY OPTIONS.

Squash is an interesting concept. Imagine powdered water flavourings, but it’s real fruit juice involved. Yet no pulp. And it’s liquid. Whilst you¬†could drink it straight from the bottle, it’d be like eating a spoonful of sugar when you’ve got a slight sweet tooth. It’s highly concentrated and depending on personal preference, you only want to fill up a standard pint glass with maybe an inch’s worth at the bottom. From there, you fill the rest with water (fizzy or flat will work) and enjoy! It comes in a ton of different flavours, and it’s probably my go-to decaffienated drink of choice.

Let’s mosey on over to the checkout at this point. Not pictured are the self-checkouts, but they are identical in every respect except instead of a Midwestern woman reprimanding¬†you to please put your item in the bagging area, it’s a posh English woman. Now let’s see if you notice the only main difference in the manned checkout…

IMG_5116

They let their employees SIT! It’s a common sight at cash registers when the employees are expected to be there all day to have a chair (and usually a semi-ergonomic looking one) so they aren’t dead on their feet by the end of their shift. I can only ask incredulously why this isn’t a thing in America because frankly, it’s fantastic and I know folks who would go home hurting pretty badly because they had to stand in one place for 8 hours.

At this point, we’ve wandered the shop and checked out. Now let’s get a look at a Tesco Express (also fondly referred to as the Teeny Tiny Tesco). This one is much closer to my flat, but being smaller they only carry essentials. Great if you’re missing honey or carrots or such for a recipe, but you wouldn’t want to use it as your main stock up place.

For perspective on this shop’s size, imagine a decently sized gas station, but it’s only got grocery store essentials in it instead of an aisle for car parts and two aisles dedicated to sweet things. For example:

Here’s the point where I started getting shadowed, else I would have taken photos of such exciting things as the cereal/grains/bread/soup aisle and the dedicated 3 doors of frozen foods.

So earlier I mentioned something about Click & Collect and having to walk a half mile home with groceries. What’s up with that you ask? Ladies and gentlemen, I am about to share something that will make you insanely envious, as it well should for it is fantastic. Living in England means I have access to the glory that is¬†online grocery shopping.¬†Are you guys ready for this?

Log-in Screen

TA DA. Now¬†this is the way to go for a grocery trip when you need to restock the pantry. Same as with the physical stores, there are plenty of companies¬†that will do groceries online, so look around for what’s the best deal for you. Sticking with the Tesco theme today though, so we’re on Tesco.com. You can look on these websites and play around with them from any country – you can even order so long as it comes to a UK address in the company’s range. I should know, as my wonderful parents have sent me groceries before. ūüôā

So looking at this front page, you should notice two main details. First, I need to get to ¬£25 to avoid the ¬£4 fee. And ¬£4 will get you a lot of food, so that’s not going to waste. Second, the Click & Collect has reappeared! But I have no car! This is nice if you want to order your groceries and just swing by to pick them up at the front desk on the way home from work, but doesn’t do me much good. What’s that option on the left though? Does this mean I’m not trudging home with six bags through the cold wind? Why yes, yes it does.

Shopping 1

Let’s do a faux shop to give you an idea of how this works. I can always use some milk, so let’s toss that in the basket. Ooo, no whole milk in 2 litres. That’s okay, I’m a skimmed milk gal myself.

Shopping 2If you get milk, you always have to get bread, so I’ll just check the special offers out. Hey, they’ve got that tasty bread I liked on offer. I’ll grab one! Oh wait, I’ve missed the sale. Thanks for pointing that out Tesco! I’ll grab two! (You can conceivably click the Special Offer at the front page and buy only things on sale for an entire shopping order. I should know. I’ve done it once.)

Money Total

Speeding through the process, I’ve made it to my minimum spending amount and it lets me know how many clubcard points I’ve earned (good to spend on cheaper petrol) as well as any savings I’ve racked up. At this point, this will be the final price. However, I can choose substitute down here if I¬†really want to make sure I get some bread. They could glitch the system and actually be out of that one on sale and allowing substitutions means a bread of equal (ish) value will arrive. (Sometimes it’ll be a nicer item, sometimes lower quality.) If I say no substitutions and the bread is gone, I’ll be refunded the price¬†and the delivery driver will let me know what didn’t make it.

Here’s the basket in full, explaining what I’m buying and what sales I’ve gotten. It also gives a rough approximation of how long the fresh food will be good for, just like the labels found on the produce earlier.

Delivery Address

Next, you enter your details for delivery (blurred out for this occasion). After you’ve confirmed this delivery you’ve got some time available (Tesco says until 8:30 the morning of if your delivery is after 7pm, but different companies have different rules) in which you can come back and change your order around to add anything you might have forgotten or change a carrot for a parsnip or such. Or to add all those heavy tinned goods and soda that you didn’t want to lug back from the shop yourself.

Time Slot 1

You next pick a time slot. As it’s around 10pm now, I’m definitely not getting anything delivered tonight, but tomorrow is still available. Those crumpets will have to wait for another breakfast.

Time Slot 2Hmm, let’s go for the 9-10pm slot because I’m lame and know full well I’ll be in then tomorrow. From here, you just enter in card details and you’ll get a confirmation email. That easy!

It’s at this point that you can run into trouble in flats, and I have. Tesco and Asda both grump and grumble about bringing the¬†groceries up to my flat, but Ocado has no issue doing so. I take the stance that if I’m being lazy enough to have groceries delivered, I want to be able to stay in my PJs if I so desire and tend to go with Ocado so they’ll bring them straight to my kitchen. Your milage (and levels of lazy) may vary.

So yeah, that’s the exciting experience that is grocery shopping here in the UK!

— Kate