Hidden Places: Lacock

Everyone always goes to London when they come from America. I get it. It’s got all the big museums and attractions. I’m not saying you¬†shouldn’t go to London. I love London. But if you want something old and beautiful and uniquely English, you need to go to the West Country to visit the little village of Lacock.

Lacock is in Wiltshire, about 3 miles away from the much larger town of Chippenham. Nearly the entire village is owned by the National Trust, and it fiercely maintains its quaint, historic appearance because of this.

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Pretty sure I’ve seen this in Harry Potter.

Lacock has been around since at least the time of the Domesday book, in which is was mentioned as having a population of about 175 people. There is an abbey in the village that was founded in 1232 and is frequently used for films as it is in fantastic shape. The village itself survived through the ages off the wool trade and being a crossing point for the nearby River Avon.

With the exception of the abbey, most of the houses in the village are from the 1700s. However, there is still a medieval church, a 15th century inn, and a 14th century tithe barn still standing. They’re all beautiful architecture, and it isn’t uncommon in the warmer months to find people using sites for wedding photos!

The Talbot family (of historical photography fame) have owned the village for centuries, up until 1944 when Matilda Talbot gave the estate to the National Trust. You can see the grave of Henry Fox Talbot in the Lacock village churchyard. Unlike other National Trust sites though, this is still a living estate! Lacock obviously thrives off tourism, but people live in the village and even have a small school.

Because the village is so fiercely maintained in its historic state, it makes for prime filming. Signs for businesses cannot be posted to the wall like any other town, which makes it easy to work into many different time periods and places. Among other things, you’ll have seen the village in Pride and Prejudice (1995), Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, and Downton Abbey.

All of this culminates in a gorgeous afternoon out, walking down the charming roads, having a pint in a medieval inn, and maybe even doing a bit of crafts shopping in the locally owned shops. Some of the houses will be opened during the day so you can get a feel for the interior of them, and some you can even rent for a holiday if you feel so inclined! I would definitely consider it as something slow paced to do, and a stunning base camp to go see the Neolithic attractions that Wiltshire is so well known for.

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Just a bit of medieval doodles. No big deal.
So if you’re looking for something off the beaten tourist path as an international visitor, I cannot recommend this place highly enough!

 

–Kate

Trip to Manchester (Winter 2017)

Another Friday off, another great journey into the North. This time around, we went for Manchester to celebrate the nephew and sister-in-law’s birthdays. Learning our lessons from driving to Leeds, we did not get off the motorway in hopes of avoiding any traffic jams. We made it to Manchester in good time, but then nearly ended up in the centre of it when our sat nav decided we should start making illegal U-turns on a busy road.

However, we managed to turn around in a bingo hall car park and get to our hotel for the evening in one piece. Everything settled and unpacked, M and I were taken to his sister and brother in law’s house. Our nephew was super excited for his party with classmates the next day and was telling us all kinds of new Harry Potter facts. The party was epically themed to Harry Potter with all credit due to my crafty sister in law A. The wee one quizzed us on our Potter knowledge all through dinner and until he was put to bed. I was excited he was honing in on a fandom I could compete with this year!

We got back to the hotel later in the evening and were sorely tempted by this majestic creature in the hallway –

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Somehow though, we resisted and went to bed. Tomorrow was a double birthday celebration after all.

We all made it to the nephew’s party somewhat on time, and were promptly put to work. Not only were M and I made prefects of different houses, we were also to put together some magical book bag parting gifts and produce a cut up birthday cake. A still managed the lion’s share of it all though, keeping all the kids occupied with games and stories and making sure they were fed. From the noises coming forth from the other room as we were on cake duty, I can only guess that the kids all had a great time of it.

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M did try to write an H in candles. Still, Haribo cake? Awesome.

Birthday mischief successfully managed, we all helped tidy and get the new toys carted back to the house before splitting up into groups again. M desperately needed a nap after all the child minding, so we hung about the hotel for a bit until it was time to go back to A’s for her birthday celebrations.

This time, the poor nephew Super Child was not coming along and he wasn’t too pleased about it. His babysitter arrived and put him in good spirits though, and we took that as our cue to head on over to the pub we were having dinner at.

It was a lovely evening out with the portion of the clan that were all in attendance and the food was super filling. I think we were all still a bit tired from the party earlier though, as we only managed the evening and not late into the night.

The next morning we tried to rectify this by going to a trendy new breakfast place in town called Brezo. It had a very boho atmosphere and the food was good, but man was it popular that morning.

By the end of the meal, we were all full on food and new Harry Potter trivia, and so we walked back to their house to digest and decide our routes for the day. The husband and I decided it was best to be off soon if we wanted to miss the rush at the afternoon, so we hopped back in the Little Red Mini and headed back towards Chelmsford. It was a short trip to see the family, but it’s good to see them all doing well.

 

— Kate