‘Round and ‘Round and ‘Round She Goes

As per usual, I have disappeared off the face of the earth when it comes to blogging, and as per usual, I will catch you up with photos to tell the highlights of the last few weeks. We begin with the end, as my lectures have wrapped up and we put together our mock up exhibition case. With only £150 and a single car badge as our object, we put together what I’d like to think is a fabulous gallery case. It had its literal and figurative ups and downs, but it finished on a high note! 🙂

I now feel fairly well versed in a long-defunct car company, let me tell you.
Save money – the Clyno way!

The next day after our “opening night” of all the teams’ cases, I had to go down to London to speak with St. Paul’s Cathedral about my possible internship this summer with them. I got the placement!! 😀 I’d love to have photos up for you, but as it’s an active cathedral you aren’t supposed to take photographs indoors. That and the day I was in was an important blessing day for the guilds of London and it was jam-packed with official people in fancy attire. Let me just say that it is going to be SUCH a great summer and I’m looking forward to turning in my dissertation so I can get on to the internship. 🙂

Tickets to London don’t always come cheap, so I spent the day with a friend roaming the streets of London and visiting some museums we hadn’t been to yet. Had a Chipotle burrito for the first time (yes, I had to leave the country they come from to try one), then went to the Hunterian Museum. I would not recommend doing this in that particular order, as the Hunterian is almost entirely animal and human bits and pieces suspended in alcohol. I have no photos because it just felt kind of wrong to take pictures of most of it. If you’ve got any interest in anatomy or the human body though, it’s a free visit and definitely worth the time. If I’d known ahead of time, I would have brought my medically inclined one to come explain some of the diseases in more depth than the museum had.

After the Hunterian, we popped over to the Cider Tap by Euston Station. There are two guardhouses on either side of one of the entrances to Euston, and one sells only craft beer while the other only sells craft cider. It’s good fun and we needed a drink and a chance to rest our feet a bit. After a pint, we visited the Wellcome Collection. (We didn’t intend to make the day a medical museum day, but it kinda happened after we saw the £17 entrance fee for the Transport Museum.) Most of this museum you cannot photograph as well, so I only got a few, but I’d definitely go back. We only had an hour and a half to see the place, but you could easily spend 3 hours in there. The collections rotate, but for our visit they had Forensics, The Institute of Sexology, Genomes, and Modern Medicine. This is another free museum, and right down the road from the British Museum if you want a change of pace.

Back home in Leicester, King Richard III was finally reburied. The city went MAD with Richard decor. A couple weeks on and they’re still peeling Richard themed things off posterboards and signs. God knows Leicester could use the tourism though. For a city this size, a lot of people don’t realise it even exists, and it’s really a shame.

While the festivities for Richard III were still going on, I took a break from my research to finally visit Jewry Wall Museum, just a quick 10 minute walk from my building. Jewry Wall is kind of a misnomer for the place, as it was actually the Roman bathhouse when Leicester was under Roman rule. Most of the building has been carted off over the years to build other structures, such as St. Nicholas’s Church behind it. Parts of it have been visible its entire existance, but the underground structure of the building and the underfloor heating portions were buried and only rediscovered in the 1930s, oddly enough when they were digging to put a community pool in. Needless to say, the pool did not happen. The museum obviously doesn’t get much money, but they’ve got really great artefacts and the staff were some of the friendliest I’ve ever met. It’s a free visit, but toss a pound or two in the donation box. 🙂

The week before Easter four of us all chipped in for a private box at the Royal Opera House in London to see Swan Lake, and we were not disappointed! If you ever get the chance to see something performed there, take it immediately. Though try to not be in a rush to get on the Tube afterwards. That was a whole new level of chaos and shoving.

Over Easter break I got to spend time in lovely Wiltshire again, so we took the opportunity to go to Avebury and let the little one go Easter egg hunting while M and I wandered around the Avebury henge. This stone circle is vastly larger than Stonehenge, and you can get right into it – even touching the stones! I’ve still not been to Stonehenge, but I’ve been told by a lot of the locals that this was the better option of the two anyway. I definitely came away highly impressed.

Finally, on our last day in Wiltshire, we took advantage of the perfect weather and went to spend the afternoon in Bath. As it was a last minute decision, we didn’t have tickets to see the Roman baths yet again, but the city is so pretty that you can easily just enjoy the view and have a nice walk around town for a few hours and be completely content with it. We also tried a microbrewery in town this time, which had some appropriately Roman named brews. I can vouch that the Brutus is indeed delicious.

So there we are. I’m now back in Leicester for a little bit and working on my dissertation all week. It’s funny when you’ve finally got all the open time in the world that you’re not going anywhere exciting, but I’ll try to remedy this as soon and often as time will allow. 🙂

— Kate

The British Museum and Relearning to Drive

Hello all! Been a busy week, but not with much to report back with that would excite the general public. I did enjoy getting to drag my favorite Englishman through a city in England he’d never been, but I’m dying to have some of the folks back in the US threatening to come visit come do the same tour. I can only imagine the comments. Thursday was the day with the most photographs this week as the museum studies department took a field trip down to the British Museum. I think the photos can stand for themselves to sum up what only a fraction of this museum has to offer.

I’ve been to the British Museum before, and I need to go yet again before I am satisfied that I’ve seen all I wanted to see. Maybe. There’s so much!

After our field trip, some of us stayed afterwards to do the London Dungeon tour, being the day before Halloween and all. If you’re a fan of blending history and pop culture with some shock scares, then this is an excellent adventure. We witnessed Jack the Ripper stalk the streets, the plague sweep through the country, and even took a boat tour through Traitor’s Gate. Mind you, they don’t mention just how much queueing is involved, but I still think it was well worth it with friends to wait with. We all grabbed a bite to eat and wandered around a little bit before we took a late train home to Leicester afterwards.

 

Friday in seminar the group discussed some of the ethical issues to be found in the British Museum (And there are loads to be discussed, really.) and from there I hopped on the train to Colchester for the weekend. There wasn’t much going on for Halloween in Leicester, and Colchester was about the same. The pubs and bars had people dressed up, and a few shops had paper pumpkins or skeleton stickers on their windows, but Halloween is celebrated with nearly the same enthusiasm as Earth Day in the States. Mostly just a reason to dress up and get a drink. Or just get a drink. Saturday however, was a more exciting prospect as I was finally convinced to hire a car for the weekend to get a feel for how to drive in England.

 

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My valiant steed.

What we thought we were getting was a Ford Mondeo (Ford Fusion in the US), which while a wider car in the UK was not all that bad. What we actually got was a minivan. A really nice new minivan, but a tank of a vehicle for such tiny English roads. Giggle now as I complain about that size, but imagine taking almost half the width off a US road and you’ll understand why it was so concerning. This poor behemoth straddled both lines of the road nearly all the time. Taking the car out of the car park, I actually got immediately into the right hand lane… Thankfully I had the ever-patient M (This man is seriously a saint.) in the passenger seat to guide me through staying on the correct side of the road and all the roundabouts we went through. You don’t notice it when you’re walking through the towns and cities, but I swear to god that half of Colchester just consists of roundabouts. Was honked at probably a good 6-7 times through Saturday as I got a crash-course (but no car crash!) in the English rules of the road I didn’t realize. Yes, as an American over the age of 25, you can in fact just hire a car with your US license. I would personally recommend to have the UK ban this practice as it’s got to be causing a significant amount of chaos on the road. I think I only managed because I had someone to tell me what I was doing was wrong. The amount of honking did go down exponentially over the next two days, but it’ll be some time before I’d be completely confident with driving in the UK as much as I was in the US. A necessary evil I suppose.

Otherwise, it was a mostly quiet week, a wonderful weekend, and now a sickly start back into the week as I deal with a persistent cough and itchy throat that have snuck up on me. Yay for new germs. Bonfire Night is tomorrow, so I hope I’m feeling well enough to get out and see some fireworks, but if not there is the perk of being in one of the tallest buildings in Leicester. Hope all is well wherever you are, and I’ll speak to y’all on the flip side of my next major essay. Wish me luck!

— Kate

Revenge of the Pumpkin Spice Latte

So I cannot tell you how many people felt the need to mention to me before I left the US, “Oh Kate, I bet you’re really gonna miss having pumpkin spice lattes in the UK. They don’t have those there.”

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For the record everybody, they do. About it in terms of pumpkin flavored anything though, so don’t start packing your bags too quickly. Oh, while we’re griping, let us discuss the grocery delivery fiasco. In the UK, it’s geographically small enough to feasibly manage grocery delivery orders. Yes folks, you can order all the groceries and household goods you’d buy on a regular trip to the store online and have them bring it to you. Depending on the time of day, this service runs you £1-£5 and an hour slot that you will definitely be in the house for. You can even look online at places like Tesco, Asda, or Sainsbury’s for an idea of how it all works. Super spiffy stuff honestly.

The fiasco began when my things were due up to be delivered. The delivery truck was about 5 minutes over the hour time frame, which I was fine ignoring, but then it just went downhill. The Tesco delivery guy finally calls my phone to say he’s here. Little odd he’s not using the intercom, but I buzzed the door open. Wait 10 minutes. Call the number back, it says the phone is off. Wait another 10 minutes. March downstairs to see if the van is here. It’s not, and the ever-patient security guard tells me there hasn’t been one. Call Tesco customer service line and explain this. They call the driver and then tell me that his phone is off. Of course it is. They tell me deliveries only run until 11 and that he may still show up (it should have been here from 9-10 that evening in the first place), but they can rebook the delivery for tomorrow just in case. Then rebooked “just in case” for 9-10 the next morning.

It did finally show the next morning at about 9:45. The delivery driver that morning let me know he was a few minutes away and so rather than wait around more than 5 minutes, I just marched downstairs. (Well, took the elevator. Nine flights of stairs is a bit melodramatic to march.) The delivery driver was just waiting in his truck for me to come down, though no one had told me this was the deal. He said he couldn’t leave his truck alone with where he was parked, so he then gave me my baskets and a moving dolly to take them upstairs myself. The maintenance guys were checking smoke alarms on my floor and were as confused as I was about why I was taking my stuff up myself. They said I should have kept the dolly. I briefly considered it. However, it wasn’t that particular driver’s fault, so I brought it down nicely and then grumbled back upstairs to put away the spoils.

Otherwise, it’s been another fantastic week here in Leicester, with a lot more hands-on experience than previously. On Tuesday we had an object handling session with bits of the Wellcome Collection that have ended up in the department here to get a feel for objects outside of their information. Using touch, smell, sight (and perhaps a little Googling), we had to try to pull together some information on objects and what made them so fascinating. It was difficult for some things, but others like this sawtooth nose were pretty easy to do.

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The crumbly bits at the bottom of the photo were actually news articles pasted on to the artifact when it was collected in around 1906.

There was rain on and off throughout the day with some impressive 40-50 mile per hour winds coming in from the leftovers of Hurricane Gonzalo. This didn’t seem to deter any students though. I personally witnessed a few sitting at the tables outside of the library, hunched over their plates and mugs, determined to have their lunch regardless of whether or not it tried to blow away. It also didn’t deter any of my fellow students from showing up to our first Museum Society meeting to vote on what all we’d like to do as a club for the year. There were some fun ideas like the upcoming trip to Liverpool or an ugly Christmas sweater party, as well as more practical ones like an essay-swap read-over day or a motion to get a microwave for the students to use in the building. (We’re far enough away from the Student Union to make it difficult at lunchtime if you need to heat a meal.)

Wednesday was a study day in the flat for the most part, but by mid-afternoon I had to wander up to the building for a Think Tank session about cabinets of curiosity through time and how they’ve influenced modern museums today. Did you know the word ‘cabinet’ used to just refer to a place (usually a room) that held objects in it, and not just what we consider cabinets today?  These privately owned cabinets, or kunstschränke, were the precursors to museums today, and some big name places like the Ashmolean and British Museum started as donated kunstschränke for the public to finally have easy access to visit. Also (and surprisingly), most collectors were actually from the professional class – apothecaries and merchants and such, not kings and princes like many people would think. Towards the end of the lecture we were put into groups and set loose to create very quick mock-ups of exhibits that behaved like cabinets of the past using objects we’d brought into the room and some provided to us. The group I worked with were all so creative and clever, and I think we were all pretty pleased with how it turned out with only 10 minutes and a dead wasp. (It’s nigh on impossible to see in the photo sadly, but the narwhal tusk is pretty obvious.)

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Thursday evening was a really cool experience in which quite a few of us from the department went to the Diwali celebration on the north side of the city. What is Diwali you ask? To quote Wiki, “Diwali or Divali also known as Deepavali and the ‘festival of lights’, is an ancient Hindu festival celebrated in autumn every year. The festival spiritually signifies the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil, and hope over despair. The festival preparations and rituals typically extend over a five day period, but the main festival night of Diwali coincides with the darkest, new moon night of the Hindu Lunisolar month Kartika.” It just so happens that Leicester has the largest Diwali celebration in the world outside of India, so of course it was a must-see!

Friday was another evening of celebration. Four people in the department all had birthdays in close succession with one another and decided to just have an event of it. This ended up being the perfect conclusion to the week with dinner at the Marquis and hopping over to The Pub afterwards. (Let us not discuss how confusing this pub’s name is. It’s like an Abbott and Costello scene all over again, but worse because the English are unfamiliar with Abbott and Costello and trying to explain this just gets you looks of deeper confusion.)

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Otherwise, this has been a quiet weekend in with lots more reading and outline sketching for the impending essay due up in a few weeks. It’s getting nippy outside and the sun is setting much earlier, but all is still fine and dandy over here! Hope all is well wherever you’re reading this from. 🙂

— Kate

What to Expect When You’re Expecting (to Move to Another Country!)

No no, no babies here. Well, perhaps a food baby from dinner tonight.

Annnnyway, I’ve been in the UK for a month now. A month on the dot today. And it’s crazy how quickly this month has gone by! (Suppose I should stop calling it jet lag and go back to the usual student sleep deprivation excuse.) It feels like I’ve done so much and yet so little in the space so far, though I think part of that was having 3 weeks to just explore at my leisure. Now that I’ve gotten a full week of the program under my belt, I get a feeling I’ll be a lot busier, though I promise I will get in a better habit of posting at least once a week, probably on Sundays like today.

So what’s happened in England to Adventurer Kate since we heard from her last? (I really wish that was still a legit job title.) Well, I’m already used to playing Guess the Time Zone to keep up with friends and family across the globe, but I got a new one this week when Dad went to Japan for a business trip. Technology makes this all even more surreal, as he FaceTimed me from his hotel to say hi before dinner as I was getting ready for lunch here. Still great to see him! Also got to fiddle around with FaceTime audio some and called family while waiting on my laundry to finish at my building’s laundry room on the ground floor. Some people will say that being in constant communication with people back in the States will just make you more homesick, but it really makes it so much nicer for me knowing I can still call my parents and tell them about what a great/awful day I’ve had. It’s also great to hear about the little things like how Mom’s classroom is doing or what’s for dinner there (I’m still jealous of that Dairy Queen run you guys. 😛 ).

Another biggie I suppose, is that I had my birthday Monday, as well as the first day of term. I’m now finally old enough for an insurance drop in prices and I can rent a car without any restrictions! Yay for 25? I have to give a major thanks to everyone that sent me cards and presents all the way out here, as it’s been immensely helpful in getting those last few things I’ve been missing in the flat. When everything finally arrives in the post, I’ll have to get up photos. I even got a ton of well wishes and a beautiful bookmark from some of my fellow students, which was incredibly sweet. 🙂

Classes have been… overwhelming to say the least. I was warned about the differences in the US and UK educational systems, but it’s another thing entirely to witness them. Everything is just assumed that you know, and you have to pretty much accost someone to get any specifics out of them. Like my student loans for example… I did get some excitement waiting in line to find out their whereabouts when the guy in front of me passed out from dehydration. After he crumpled to the ground, he woke up, started apologising profusely, then said he hadn’t had drinkable water in his room for two days. Not sure why he hadn’t gone and gotten a water bottle, but I wasn’t about to ask. Turns out when they said they would release my check on the 29th, they really meant more that the university would receive them, but that I wouldn’t get a check until tomorrow for most of it and the remainder another week after to make sure they don’t get screwed over with the currency conversion. So tomorrow I get to pick up the check and deposit it at Lloyds Bank (I have a UK bank account now! Hooray no more ATM fees!) and then wait for that to appear, and THEN I can get my landlords their next chunk o’ change. Glad that’s not due up immediately. Really, I grumble, but I get a feeling I’ll get the hang of this new education and university system without too much grief.

Classes and time after have gone by quickly, and I haven’t been taking many photos, but it’s because I’ve been hanging out and meeting new people in the department. Having awesome people to talk to and meet up with so soon has made all the difference in the world in acclimating to the university, and I’m so glad it’s worked out the way it has. I’ve not had the chance to speak more with locals, but we have a major international influence in the programme and we’ve all had some fun adjusting to the little changes in life here in the UK, such as…

Not sure what's a worse idea - these or the Cappuccino Lays variety.
Not sure what’s a worse idea – these or the Cappuccino Lays variety.

 

“So a herd of well-dressed men came into a pub we’re in and a lone man with them came in half naked with a tyre and fishnet stockings. It’s not a stag night. What is this?”  “Definitely not a stag?”  “I asked. Rugby team apparently?”  “Ahh, that explains everything.”
“So a herd of well-dressed men came into a pub we’re in and a lone man with them came in half naked with a tyre and fishnet stockings. It’s not a stag night. What is this?”
“Definitely not a stag?”
“I asked. Rugby team apparently?”
“Ahh, that explains everything.”
Well now I have to buy both and see the difference.
Well now I have to buy both and see the difference.

Oh man, there’s really been quite a lot come to think of it. But it’s now midnight and I have a 9 am class to get to tomorrow, so it’s off to bed for me. Expect another post by next Sunday at the latest, I promise.

 

— Kate

In Which She Travels Even Further

I’ve made it to Day 7 and have managed only minimal jetlag. Sleep is a bit wonky, but turning out okay. It’s been around this time in the late afternoon each day that I start regretting not making a second cup of coffee or tea, but I have yet to learn from this. Let’s see… What have I gotten into since? Well, on Tuesday a handful of students in the program all met by the clock tower (We originally were supposed to go to the Starbucks at the university, but I got two of us lost… Thankfully everyone was fantastic and they came to the tower.) and all grabbed some coffee and lunch and chatted for an hour or so. It’s SO nice to meet people before term begins, and everyone was awesome. I’m greatly looking forward to courses with them!

After we all went our separate ways, I continued with my new tradition of wandering aimlessly around the city – half genuinely lost, half somewhat aware of landmarks and just adventuring. Not having a car and aiming to walk everywhere teaches you some important lessons pretty quickly. Firstly, you really don’t need all that crap in your bag that you always take with you. Secondly, the more you can fit in your bag, the less you have to carry in flimsy plastic bags that cut off circulation in your fingers. Thirdly and most importantly, if you cannot carry it all comfortably in a basket in the shop, you are going to have a heck of a time getting it home. The only time a shopping cart is a good idea is when you have a willing victim alongside you that can help carry things home, of which I did not. Amazing what you’re capable of when you realize it’s either sit on the street and wait for an expensive taxi to come by and take your lazy rear home or just suck it up and walk already. Needless to say, I’m gaining new callouses on my feet.

Walking back from meeting fellow students and there’s a very drunk man staggering through the streets and screeching (at 3 pm). I stopped and asked some shop staff:

“What exactly is he going on about?”

“England. And some profanity. That’s all we can understand. He just came out of the pub, so sports maybe.”

Exciting.

Back at my flat, it was time for mail call!

Have I mentioned recently that I have amazing parents? Because they not only sent me things I needed that were going to be hard to walk back from the shops with, but also a surprise with the sweeteners.  I have since christened the coffee machine and can gladly dismiss the stereotype that the British do not have good coffee. Picked up a Colombian fresh roast from Tesco that tasted great.

After unpacking presents, it was a walk to the train station to catch up with one of my favorite Twitter people! I take great offense at people who say that technology is ruining our social lives and that we all need to leave the phones at home. Yes, you should always engage with those talking to you, but the internet only helps to broaden that scope. My life would be much poorer without the weirdness of social media, and I wouldn’t want to change it. Heck, even meeting everyone from the program ahead of time was due to Facebook and email. Making new friends, the millennial way. 😉 Had a massive “You’re a real person again!” squeal, then set out on the city to talk and catch up with so much that’s happened since last we saw each other in November.

I would like to apologise to the now local ( 😀 ) people in my life as the anthropologist in me has been having a field day. Coming to a new place you’ll always have new experiences to process, (sometimes happens just crossing America) but instead of just shrugging it off with a “well that’s odd,” I have an intense curiosity to find out why things work that way. It’s my motto to always look at life and new things as interesting, never weird or “not like home.” The world works around things in many different ways, and societies are fascinating because of it. Over the space of dinner my poor friend was questioned on how the bank overdraft in the UK works (you can pull much, much more over the limit of what you have in your account than in the US), the why/when/how of putting x’s at the end of text messages (best stick to loved ones to be on the safe side), and the curious absence of doggie bags/boxes in UK restaurants (though honestly, if you walk everywhere it’d be a pain to carry that around). And of course, any time you share restaurants around the world, you’re bound to get a giggle out of the menus and signs.

This leads us into Wednesday, which was a travel day. Brief wander around town, but I had also packed up a bag and made sure to wash the dishes in the sink. By the afternoon, I wheeled my bag to the train station and hopped on the first of two trains to Colchester, where I’ll be visiting for a little over a week. Trains really are the way to get around in this country, though there’d have to be a cultural shift to have something like this happen across the United States. Maybe when gas hits $10 a gallon it might become more of a thing. Be sure to bring something to read with you though, because playing on your phone will suck the life out of it and unless you’re in a first class seat, there’s no guarantee you’ll have a charging place for your plug. Also, if you qualify for a railcard and plan on doing more than a quick journey or only one ride, it is well worth the price for the card in the savings you’ll accrue over time. Train travel is still at reasonable costs, but that little bit helps.

On the train from Leicester to my change point in London, I just happened to sit across the way from two Texans visiting friends in Nottingham and heading back to London for the evening. Sadly, they were University of Texas alumni and my family are Texas A&M alumni, so we were sworn enemies. I kid, I kid! It was nice to hear a random “y’all” so far from the source. 🙂

Oh! An important thing I learned when you come in to London in one station and have to leave from another to make your connection – you don’t have to cough up cash or your Oyster card to use the Underground as long as you go from point A to point B. Make sure your ticket has a little cross printed on it somewhere on the bottom and you’ll just feed your ticket through the reader at the Underground barriers, letting you both in and out. Basically, DON’T LOSE THAT TICKET. You’ll also be using it to get through the barriers coming and going from each train station as well. Another random but important fact – there are toilets on the trains, but you can’t use them in the station because the flush system just dumps it out of the bottom of the train on older models. Eww.

So as I write this, I’m now safely in Colchester, about 2 hours away from Leicester by train. I’ve got near and dear people to pester, and as it turns out there are a few other foreigners that I may get to catch up with in London! The world is shrinking every day, and it’s pretty interesting to witness. Hope all is well wherever you are. 🙂

— Kate

Getting Acclimated

While my sleep schedule is still not quite on the right time zone, I think I’m slowly getting an idea of where the main places in town are. I’ve been using reference buildings and just kind of wandering aimlessly until I see one again. The Magazine Gateway and the Clock Tower seem to be my go-to’s. Have been going out and walking around the city every day so far for at least a few hours, and I’ve already seen Every Street! *wah wah waaaaaah*

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It was a terrible pun and I regret nothing.

There are a few buildings that really stand out, like the city’s most hated building owned by Premier Inn. It looks like a lego or something. You cannot miss that bad boy. There’s also the Leicester Markets which were closed yesterday, but looked promising, and the Guildhall that I need to go see beyond just in passing. It’s got bits from the 1390s and is still standing and it’s JUST SO COOL. And of course, there are plenty of buildings and statues and such that make excellent reference points like the clock tower!

Decided to see if I could get my student ID today, so I headed over to campus this morning and timed my mosey-ing pace along the way to get a good estimate of when I should head out for classes in the mornings. Taking my time, it’s a 30 minute walk. I’ll probably shave some time off during the course of the year, but it’s such a pretty walk too!

Seems I’m to wait until the international welcome week to get my ID or do much of anything, so after a short wander around the campus, I decided to take the scenic New Walk to the city centre and waste a few hours walking new streets in town. The Leicester Markets were open today, and they are well worth a visit! It was like a flea market and farmer’s market mixed in one that’s been operating for the last 700 years! I’m getting ready to travel out of Leicester Wednesday, so I didn’t pick up any food, but I am definitely going to at some point when I get back in.

Finally, after a few hours of walking and the rising complaints from my feet, I started heading back to the flat only to be distracted by the Leicester Cathedral. The Cathedral is approximately 1,000 years old, but still looks magnificent. There’s currently some heavy construction going on with it as they prepare for Richard III’s reinterment, but the staff were still very nice and even told me to come by for cakes and tea and evensong sometime. I’ve never heard prayers sung back and forth before. It sounds like something worth popping in to listen to sometime. 🙂

 

Anyway, that’s what I’ve been up to so far. Meeting up with fellow students and a fabulous old Twitter pal tomorrow, so it’s really starting to feel like much more than a vacation! 🙂

 

— Kate

Let’s just go!

The university has opened online registration, and I am officially signed up (as much as I can before my campus visa checkpoint – don’t ask, I have no idea) for the University of Leicester! My student ID should be ready for me when I get there. I’m excited. 🙂

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.34.34 pmScreen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.34.43 pmAlso got word from the Museum Studies department with a tentative schedule of the first two weeks, and I’m pleasantly surprised to see that classes aren’t really early so far. I was trying to prepare myself for 8:00 times, but 9 and 10 are totally cool too. Just from the titles, it looks like a fascinating start!

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So now I’m only really left with buying a ticket for the bus, a ticket for the train to Leicester, and packing my bags. It’s one thing to sell off most of your life to get ready to live out of what fits in a suitcase. It’s another thing entirely when you start to fill up said suitcase. SO MANY THINGS. SO MANY CHOICES. What have I forgotten that might actually be really important?

Considering I’m to be living in Leicester for a year (10 months actually, then 2 months out interning, then who knows where next?), I really can’t bring all that much along with me. I suspect leaving the country makes a minimalist out of you eventually. I took the main idea of a packing list from Study Abroad and tweaked it a bit, but do you see anything I’m missing or really won’t need? I haven’t done a weigh in on my bags quite yet, so there may be some tossing out of things anyhow.

In reality, I can almost promise it will be me shoving what remains of my closet after losing weight these last two years into my bag with the questionably useful and/or ill-fitting but still beloved clothing going in last in case they need to be pulled out and left behind. Mom also managed to find a carry-on sized space saver bag, so the sweaters may be getting the big squeeze and going in my carry-on bag. Honestly though, I don’t think the weight limit is going to be a major issue. But with no further ramblings, I’ll leave you with the ULTIMATE STUDY ABROAD PACKING LIST. 😛

— Kate

The Ultimate Study Abroad Packing List

Clothing:

  • Underwear – two weeks’ worth (Two weeks worth? Let’s be real. All the underwear comes along. We don’t leave behind good underwear.)
  • Socks – two weeks’ worth (Yeah yeah, it’ll be the ones that aren’t questionably falling apart. They’re socks. Pretty sure I can get a new pair or two in England, just possibly.)
  • Camisoles (Layering all day, err’ day.)
  • Thermal leggings (I seriously doubt the use of these, but man are they comfy.)
  • Tops
  • Sweaters
  • Trousers
  • Skirts
  • A set or two of workout clothes (Will it promote my going to the gym? Unlikely.)
  • Pajamas
  • Swimsuit
  • Coat/Jacket
  • At least one nice outfit for formal occasions
  • Shoes (I fear my fancy sandals will not see much use, but then again, I’ve been living in Chacos since March. Yay for my body always running on high heat?)

Toiletries:

  • TSA Compliant Toiletry Kit (Enough to clean up for a day or two until I get things there. I can already sense my desperate need to shower upon arrival after learning my lesson last time.)
  • Brush and comb (If they weren’t needed right after said emergency shower, I’d say forget it.)
  • Contact lenses and solution (Yay being blind!)
  • Glasses (Does this really count if it’s on my face?)
  • Nail clippers (Teeny tiny justifiable-bringing-along-in-case-of-brutal-hangnail-attack pair.)
  • Makeup (No one likes to play games with new brands on makeup. Especially not ALL the makeup at once.)
  • Medications (Yay drugs! Now to make sure they all have my name written on them.)

Extras:

  • Some cash in £ (Pleased with myself now for having a handful of £2 coins and a fiver that accidentally came home with me last year. That’s some snack money whilst in the customs line!)
  • Purse/ wallet
  • Important documents (passport, visa, itinerary, plane tickets, ISIC card, etc.)
  • Outlet adapter (Actually not sure I’ll need one. Livin’ the USB plug life means international is SO much easier.)
  • Sunglasses (Didn’t need these once last time. I blame it on living in big sky country for the last four years.)
  • Cell phone with changed out SIM card for UK and USB charger (Many thanks for getting me that old iPhone unlocked and a UK SIM shipped over!)
  • Laptop and charger (Must not forget to change the plug on the charger!)
  • Camera w/cords and USB charger
  • Kindle and USB charger
  • Water bottle/ Nalgene bottle (Depending on space/amount of cares given, might just get one past security. I’m flying BA, they dole out tea and wine like it’s going out of style.)