It’s been a busy summer.

And yes, I’m starting summer in April. It’s been a weird year.

They aren’t kidding, a PhD is a lot more work than it looks like. Been flitting back and forth between working and travelling, and am going to give you the photo montage catch up. Let us begin with April then eh?

April 2019

In April I went to the SEAHA Conference in Oxford. I got to stay in the swankiest of student accomodation, presented my poster, and then spent time dodging rain and doing some sightseeing in the afternoons and evenings. Also got to have lunch in one of the colleges, which felt very Harry Potter-esque.

Straight after the SEAHA Conference, M and I went to Malta! It was warmer and sunnier than the UK, we had the sea out the window, and there was a lot of Really Old Things to look at. It was an excellent choice. We stayed in Xemxija (which is covered in prehistoric, Roman and Phoenician remains, and the oldest tree on the island btw) and travelled around the country to Valletta, Mdina, and Rabat. Valletta is the capital and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Like most places like this, the main street is flooded with tourists, but if you go two streets down you can wander nearly empty areas. Mdina is the Silent City, as no cars (other than people who live there) are allowed in the walled city, and even then you only really see them parked in a few areas. It’s like walking into a movie set. Rabat is the town right outside of Mdina, which has early Christian catacombs, a Roman villa, and the strangest car park design I’ve ever witnessed.

Sadly, we did have to come home and back to real life. I had some data acquisition at the museum from our scanning electron microscope trials and did work both at home (with cat company) and in the museum.

We managed the first BBQ of the year in April, when a random warm weekend showed up and we decided to make the most of it. It was wise, as the weather was a bit weird after that.

I did also pop down to London to the UCL campus to become inducted into the Institute of Making. It’s the university’s MakerSpace, and gives me access to a huge plethora of tools and ideas for making any old idea I get in my head. The idea is spreading, so check if you have a MakerSpace in your area!

Finally, I got to prep, CT scan, metal coat and SEM data capture a beefly as my first attempt for data for my dissertation. It totally didn’t work, but the beefly did make a nice little victory pose for the scans.

 

May

May was a hectic month. Started it with the annual trip to Lyme Regis with the NHM to volunteer at the Fossil Festival. Lyme Regis still looks exactly as I left it, and the kids still know more about dinosaurs than I do.

Came home from Lyme Regis, washed some clothes, and threw them back in my suitcase to head off to Amsterdam directly afterwards for the 2+3D Photography Conference at the Rijksmuseum. Ophelia did not approve of my leaving. Amsterdam was a fun city to visit, but very expensive. Also, hunting for a historical building will probably lead you through the red light district and you should be prepared for the surreal experience of prostitutes in windows. Would definitely recommend the Rijksmuseum though. They’ve got a massive collection of All Things Dutch, and have displayed it really well.

Back from the Netherlands, M and I decided we wanted to attempt camping again. Reader, one night it got so cold that ice formed on our tent. If there is anything to be learned from this second attempt, it is that camping should never be done as early as May. During the days we had a good time of it though, with rather pleasant weather.

We had to detour down from Suffolk to Chelmsford to get M’s car fixed mid trip, but we used it as an excuse to see the remnants of the Springfield Lyons Bronze Age Enclosure. You can see where the perimeter of a camp used to be, as well as some burials. Again, felt a bit like walking onto a movie set.

We also visited Southwold again, and a new visit to Dunwich – the city that fell in the sea. It’s a really interesting story, and the last vestiges of the thriving medieval city can be walked around. Plus there’s a beach, and that’s always nice on a sunny day.

I tried whitebait when we were out camping one night when we went to the nearby pub. I had no idea what it was. Turns out, it’s like fish fingers that can stare back at you. As long as you don’t stare back, they’re not bad actually. M is still unconvinced.

Towards the end of the month the weather got better and I did as much work as I could outside in the back garden. Judging from the grassprint I left, perhaps too much. When the weather wasn’t behaving, it was all good though as M built me my new desk! It feels like a real office upstairs now.

Finally, we celebrated M’s birthday and had some walks about town to enjoy the new signage that Colchester seems to be putting up everywhere. Some are odder than others.

 

June

In June we went to Italy with M’s family and stayed in a town outside of Venice called Lido di Jesolo. Honestly, if you don’t have ALL the pasta, what are you even doing? The weather was gloriously sunny, the mosquitos were in full force, and there was always something to go see or do.

One of the days there we went to Venice proper. Venice is exactly as beautiful as everyone says it is. However, it is also filled with every tourist all at once. The day before we went a cruise ship accidentally ran into one of the docks, so they banished them all from docking when we were there and I’m not sure it made the blindest bit of difference. Still, you should definitely go. But maybe stay in the city itself and enjoy it when the tourists start thinning out.

Back in London, I was back in the lab helping with an intern doing some SEM work for me. We scanned all kinds of microfossils. We also pushed the SEM to its limits and ended up finding a fault in the contrast that nobody had noticed before and had to call out repairmen. Fun times. We also got to go up one of the towers of the museum, courtesy of my supervisor, which was a legitimately fun time.

There had been a heatwave all month and towards the end it finally broke with a deluge of rain to try and make up for the previous lack of it. SO. MUCH. RAIN. This has been a trend that continued throughout the summer, with a spell of no rain and high heat, then humidity going through the roof, then a torrent of rain.

Back at the museum, I finally got a chance to see the temporary Museum of the Moon exhibit. It’s free, so well worth a visit, but it’s also pretty darn cool.

Mostly though, I was downstairs doing work. Like sorting out butterflies in a box. And then bringing said butterflies to an after hours museum event to explain what I’m trying to do for my PhD to members of the public that walked through. So far everyone has nice things to say about it. So far.

Also, one day I decided to make a log of how long it takes me to get from London back home to Colchester. Not sure I want to know how long it takes going the other way after doing this. I mean, obviously I have an idea, but it just confirms my lunacy in hyper-commuting like this.

July

Not nearly so much going on in July. Went to Manchester for the MMC 2019 Conference and presented some of the work I’d been up to thus far at the Zeiss Microscopy booth. Got to see some really interesting work done in the microscopic world, and even learned a few tips and tricks. And it being Manchester, we got rained on.

Went to a wedding for one of M’s good friends as well. Beautiful converted barn location out in the West Country. Fabulous couple, amazing food, and riotous dancing were all a part.

Otherwise it was mostly just time sat in the lab, working on data acquisition and attempting some experiments.

Oh yes, we also painted the kitchen. And then got a phone call that they could take my gallbladder out the next day. So that happened. And then I got to wear those glorious compression socks for a week. God, those drugs were heavy duty. I didn’t have any pain issues, but I also seem to have lost 4 days worth of proper memories. To be fair, one of those was the hottest day of the year, so I don’t miss that one much.

 

August

August has been frantic catch up of data acquisition post-surgery and then write up of dissertation based off said data. This means I’ve been knocking about the house A LOT. So much so that I got to see our new wheelie bins delivered as our council has decided to join the 21st century and collect rubbish from bins rather than bags on the ground that get savaged by seagulls, cats, and foxes.

The heat came back, and with it I made sun tea. Ophelia guarded it carefully.

Most of the time though, I’ve been dragging the chair and table out and do my work in the sunshine.

There was some rain again, of course right before my early birthday BBQ. I watched the weather apps religiously up until the day and stared out of the office window.

Thankfully, the weather mostly held on the day, just giving us some exceptional winds. It was great to see everyone, though hopefully next time will be a bit less breezy!

 

And there we are, basically up into today. From here on out I’ll just be frantically writing up this dissertation and then prepping for the oral examination with PowerPoint that’s due to come afterwards. Oh yes, and waiting for ethics approval to do the proper PhD work as well with minors. But hey, what is academia if not a long list of things to do, things to chase up, and things to wait to happen?

 

— Kate

How to Fly Transatlantic 101

This was originally intended for one of my lovely humans who hasn’t flown before. However, I’m realising that there are quite a few people in my life who have never flown, or at least never flown abroad, and I thought it might put some other folks at ease. With no further ado, I shall ramble forth about flying from the US to the UK. If you’re going anywhere else your milage may vary, but I’d like to think these are mostly all decent tidbits to take with you on any transatlantic occasion.

So you say the flying process makes you nervous eh? Well fear not my new explorer – we have you covered from airport to airport! I am going to assume you are a clever human in all things and likely have researched plenty of this already, but I’ll go ahead and explain everything just in case you arrive into the airport, panic, and go into a flight-induced amnesia with only this post to guide you. Before we even get into the airport though, let us prepare you for what you need to bring.

Before You Leave
Passport: Obviously you will need your passport. However, your first instinct will be to place it somewhere safe, either in the depths of your handbag or somewhere on the surface of your suitcase. Do not follow this instinct! You will want to keep it somewhere super easy to get to, but not in a place it can be bent. TSA gets really grumpy about manhandled passports, and UK Customs are even worse. You will be pulling it in and out of your bag until you are finally settled into your seat on the plane, and you won’t want to just keep it in your hand the whole time because that will make you nervous that it could go missing. There are of course passport protectors, but I find the nice zippered side pocket in my handbag does well. I will leave the option to you.

Plane Ticket: You should always print out all the information you have about flight times and whatnot and keep it with you when traveling in case of emergency. You can also print your ticket with most flight companies (if not all). If you can, go ahead. If not, the front desk at the airport will help you with this. I’ll delve into that later.

Snacks: Do not let them fool you – you can take your own snacks past security. They just can’t be liquid-y, so your Gogurt is either about to be kicked back like some amazing dairy shot at the front entrance or the TSA will take it away from you and ruin your day. If you’ve got some Naturebox squares or anything else though, bring as much as you like. Airports are captive audiences and charge accordingly. I once had to pay $7 for a ham and cheese sandwich at Dallas-Fort Worth and I could have wept. Also, while you can’t take liquids through, you CAN take empty bottles through. To make TSA happy, bring a clear one (either reusable or disposable) and if they look at you funny, just tell them you didn’t want to buy a drink and are filling it up at the water fountain on the other side. This is totally allowed. I’d also highly recommend it, as planes can make you really thirsty. You are of course allowed to just buy beverages on the other side too. We’ll get to that. Also, unless your carry-on bag is visibly heavy for you to carry, they aren’t going to weigh it and you can load yourself down like a happy little snack mule.

Cash: Don’t worry about having UK funny money ready when you get on the plane. People always tell you this and they are always crazy. The only time you’d want any cash is waiting to go through customs to use the vending machine, but you’d need small change you wouldn’t have anyway. Just let your bank and/or credit card company know that you’re going to be in England from X date to X date (you can let them know this now, they just put a note on your account) and they’ll know not to freeze your cards when you use them. Just like there, almost everyone here uses cards for everything. However, it’s good to always keep about £20 on you for things likes drinks or taxi fare. It’s up to you if you want to just use your card the whole time, or if you want to do a cash withdrawal. Almost none of the ATMs here charge a withdrawal fee, but US banks will for having to do an international transaction. This is BS, as they don’t tack that on to debit card transactions, but whatever. Check and see what the current charge for an ATM will be online and decide if you want to just do it all in cash or not. You can take all the bills back to a bank in the US and they can exchange them for dollars, but they refuse to do it for any coins. Keep that in mind if you do go for cash. If you’ve got enough coinage, there will definitely be people here willing to trade you for a £5, £10, or £20.

Pillow: There is literally no way to comfortably sleep in economy class. None. If you’re lucky and the doofus in front of you doesn’t recline their seat the 2.3 inches backwards, you can sometimes sleep on your tray like we all used to in high school on the desks. You will wake up with dead arms. If you have a window seat, you can lean against it and try to sleep. It will be cold and likely vibrating. If you can handle sleeping just leaning back, I would highly recommend one of those neck pillows you always see. Someone always has one floating around somewhere, so borrow it and wear it with pride.

Attire: You will quickly see that there are two types of people in airports – fashion runway types, and just rolled out of bed types. Unless you’re reuniting with your love after years, I’d recommend the rolled out of bed look. I mean, you can even be pretty stylish these days. Yoga Queen is probably the best fashion option. The outfit is stretchy and the shoes are sensible. Speaking of shoes, you have a 50/50 shot of having to take them off these days. Honestly, it’s not the end of the world to need to re-lace your sneakers after you go through security. They have benches available for you to do just that. Wear what you find most comfortable. Don’t wear anything majorly metal that can’t come on and off quickly. Don’t worry – glasses and underwire bras do not set off the metal detectors. Oh, and pack a cosy jacket or hoodie. You can carry it separately to not take up room in your bags and they won’t consider it luggage. It’ll be good for sleeping in.

Suitcase: Weigh that bad boy before you leave! Nothing is more embarrassing than having to do the reshuffling of things into separate bags to make the weight limit. Unless you absolutely need any of your toiletries with you for overnight, just put them all in the suitcase. Also be sure that you can comfortable lift and carry your suitcase if need be. England is not known for its wheel-friendliness, and you’re likely to be lugging it up stairs or over cobblestones at some point.

Carry-on Bag: This will be the bag of food, important paperwork, entertainment, and freshening up supplies. Generally you have the luxury of being allowed one personal bag and one hand luggage bag. (You should anyway. Double check. I think only RyanAir cracks down on that.) You could do a small wheelie suitcase as your carry-on, but I typically go for a backpack or gym bag. You can shove them under your seat during the flight and won’t have to bother the person next to you whenever you need something that would otherwise have to go into the overhead bin. Now this and your handbag will have to go through the x-ray machine at the airport, so make sure you’ve emptied out any shady materials like fingernail clippers and eye makeup remover. If you wanted to bring any travel sized liquids on board the plane with you (say mouthwash or dry shampoo), put them in a clear ziplock bag and leave them near the top of the carry-on. You’ll need to be able to take these out when they go through the x-ray machine. Otherwise, fill this as you will. You’re going to have a TV screen in the back of the chair in front of you to watch movies/tv on, so remember to bring headphones. Otherwise, I’d just say a book and a portable charger for your phone if you want your music. Most of your trip ends up being sleeping, attempting to sleep, eating, or staring out the window.

At the Airport
Check-in Desk: When you arrive, you’re going to need to find your check-in desk. It will either be the obvious one with your company name and/or logo on it, or possibly the name of the company that they’ve teamed up with.  If you end up at the wrong desk or just can’t find yours, any of them can guide you in the right direction. Regardless of whether you’ve already printed your ticket, you’re going to have to go up to the check-in desk for your checked bags. Just hand them your passport and flight information/ticket and they’ll guide you through the rest. They’ll have to ask you, like the post office, that you aren’t carrying anything hazardous or illegal, etc etc. Then they’ll weigh your bag, stick a tag around the handle, and give you your paperwork back. Typically airports are surprisingly easy to navigate, but if you would like directions where your terminal is, you can always ask now. With one less bag to drag around, you can now head to security. Woo.

Security: Security will prepare you for England and its never ending queues. There is absolutely nothing to be nervous about here. TSA, for all the grief we hear about them, are actually pretty chill. They may even offer to let you go through the fast lane if they aren’t too busy. If you get that, it’s AWESOME. You just throw your bag in a bin like usual, but you don’t have to take anything out of it. You even get to walk through the scanner with your coat and shoes on. I think they even smile a little bit.

If you’re stuck in the line with the rest of the plebs, don’t worry. You can fiddle on your phone in the line, but it’s best to put it away when you get within sight of the security team. They get grumpy about phones. At that point though, you get to people watch as literally everyone in front of you forgets basic tasks like taking off their massive belt buckle, or throwing away the Coke bottle in their bag. Don’t be that person. No one likes that person. Instead, awe the crowd by preemptively taking off your jacket and having your bag ready. You’ll likely need two plastic bins. It’s normal. Your bag will go in one, then if your handbag can fit you can put it in with it. If not, you can put it in a separate bin. In the separate bin you’ll also need to put any personal electronics (phone, Kindle, laptop if you brought it, etc), coins, metal watches, rings, belts with metal buckles, your jacket, and an offering to the Airport Gods. They seem to be disinterested in incense. If everyone else is taking off their shoes, go ahead and put yours in that bin too.

At this point, your bags will go on without you, unless some goober has put something questionable in their bag, in which case you’ll likely be waiting on the other side for a while as it slows down EVERYONE’S x-ray bag check. Sometimes at this point you can sneak a peak at the x-ray images, which is cool. Don’t look obvious doing it though, as I don’t think you’re really supposed to be looking. Anyhow, you’re going to be in a line to walk through the metal detector/backscatter machine. (The backscatter machines seem to be on the way out. I’ve only ever seen two.) Wait until they call/wave you over to go through the machine, and just walk through it at a leisurely pace. On the off chance you get stopped for beeping, they’ll wave you over with a metal detecting wand and maybe have to pat you down. If so, you’re pulled to the side and a person of your gender will pat you down with the back of their gloved hand. I’ve had it happen once and it was really no big deal. Regardless, you’ll soon be through it and can collect your things from the bins on the other side. Once you’re suited back up, it’s time to head towards your terminal! Regardless of what languages you speak, airport terminal signs are pretty easy to figure out. Follow the signs and/or shuttles to whichever one you need. If the desk didn’t tell you, it will be on your ticket, along with your gate. Your ticket will also say what flight number you’re on. Just to be safe, always check the screens with flight information for your flight number in case they move you to another gate.

Wasting Time: Once you’ve gotten to your terminal and found the gate you’re supposed to be at, you’ve got options. If you’ve got an hour or so to kill before the flight leaves, you can always wander the shops or grab something to eat/drink. Here in the UK it’s a tradition to have an alcoholic beverage as soon as you’ve cleared security, regardless of time of day, but I can’t say it’s super common in the US. If you’re content with what you’ve brought with you, I’d recommend just grabbing a seat at your gate before they all fill up and waiting until they start boarding. They are never comfortable seats, so don’t plan for a nap unless you can sleep on the floor. Also, if you need to charge something and you see a wall plug available, RUN TO IT. There are never enough and it’s like a Black Friday sale when they open up.

Boarding the Plane: Eventually they’ll start calling zones to board the plane. Your ticket will tell you what zone you are, so just listen up for the staff to call it. Continuing the grand tradition of standing in line, you’ll then stand in line while they check everyone’s ticket and passport against the machine. Have them at hand for this, and don’t put it away after. Next, you’ll walk through the little tunnel bit (whose name I have forgotten) and wait in line for people to get to their seats in the plane. When you get to the plane entrance, a flight attendant will check your ticket and tell you where your seat is. Just head on over to it, stow your bags either in the overhead bin or under the seat in front of you, then buckle up and wait. You can have your tray down and play with your phone from now until the takeoff begins. They’ll explain this to you beforehand and will say when you can have them out again later.

On The Plane
Drinks: Depending on the company you fly with when you go transatlantic, you may be offered complimentary alcoholic beverages. These are great for calming nerves about flying, or for helping you wind down to try and sleep. I’m a big fan of accepting any offers in hopes it will help me snooze, but I leave this judgment to you. Otherwise, alcohol on flights is going to be somewhat overpriced as you would expect.
 
Food: Now unless you go with Iceland Air, I’m fairly certain every company will feed you on a transatlantic flight as part of your ticket price. Don’t let the comedians over the years concern you – airplane food has improved drastically and you’ll find it to generally be pretty good. It’s doubtful that you’ll be able to sleep so soon, but if you do they can sometimes not disturb you and pass you up on dinner. I’d recommend staying conscious until at least after food. Otherwise, you won’t get another included meal until about an hour before landing. At that point, they’ll usually bring a light breakfast. The few times I’ve flown over, it’s typically a scone with clotted cream and jam. They are delicious and you should totally grab that option! Tea and coffee are typically offered a few times in the morning, and soda/water/alcohol are offered during the evening. If at any point you’re suddenly starving and/or parched, you can always press the attendant button above you and you can ask for something when they come by. I’ve been told if you bring the attendants some snacks or sweets (purchasable in the duty free shop at that!) and gift them to the attendant towards the beginning of the flight that you will have super friendly staff during your flight. I mean, I’d be pretty friendly to someone who offered me snacks and was nice to me too, but I can’t promise anything.

Buttons/Lights: You’ll have seen these all in the movies. No smoking, don’t get up when the seatbelt sign is on, etc. They’ll explain it all on the plane before takeoff, including the general safety rules. What is of more importance is that you manoeuvre your A/C to hit your face where you want it, and then twist the dial bit on it to control how much air comes out. It can be surprisingly chilly. Also, you’ll have an overhead light to read by. You shouldn’t be a bother to fellow passengers if you read later in the flight, but it all depends how light a sleeper they are.

In-Flight Entertainment: I’ve yet to hear of a transatlantic flight that didn’t have a screen in the back of each chair for you to watch movies and tv from in this day and age. At this point, most will even let you pick what you want to watch so you don’t have to watch a communal movie. If you’re lucky, some will also have basic games to play. Also, they generally all have a constantly updating map of where you’re flying. I like to leave that on when I fall asleep, but that’s up to you. You’ll be surprised how much of your trip involves flying over Canada instead of the ocean when you’re flying from the West. Otherwise, I can only recommend putting in headphones as soon as possible regardless of whether you’re listening to anything unless you want a chance of being chatted to the entire flight.

Sleeping: As mentioned previously, you’re unlikely to get a good night’s sleep. If someone leans their chair back in front of you, you can kiss sleeping on the tray goodbye. You’ll likely be given a thin blanket and small pillow by your airline, which are a nice gesture. However, this is when that jacket or hoodie you brought will come in most handy. A lot of people also recommend taking a Benadryl, but I’d only recommend it if you know it won’t leave you semi-comatose when you do wake up in a few hours time. Sleepy in a new country going through customs is not impossible, but not particularly fun. With that in mind, we jump to getting off the plane!

Going through Customs
Luggage: Depending on what airport you come into, some will have you pick up your luggage and THEN go through customs, while some will have the carousels on the other side. The majority will have them on the other side, so waiting will be easier. Regardless, when you get to the luggage carousels you’ll just need to look for the one with your company and flight number and just wait. Don’t join the mob clumped around the spout where the luggage all comes out. They are all convinced that suitcase thieves lurk amongst them. If you literally walk about 12 feet down the line, your suitcase will still come to you and you won’t have to fight people out of the way to reach it before it does another lap.

Queueing: Anyway, you’re going to have to queue. Be prepared to queue. As a non-UK, non-EU citizen, you’ll find a queue that usually just says something like “All Other Passports.” Depending on the airport, it’s awesome being an Other Passport as the wait will be non-existant. Sometimes though, you’ll get stuck behind someone from a country that the UK isn’t overly fond of and find yourself waiting ages while the poor soul is interrogated to the ninth degree. In this time, you should be digging up your passport and ticket again. Also, you should have been given/offered a customs card of some sort when you were flying in. If you haven’t already filled this in, do so now. You can’t pass through without it. If you don’t have one, there should be more floating around the customs area. On it they’ll want basic information like your flight details (both ways), your passport number, your full name, and the address of where you’ll be staying. Put this card with your ticket at the front of your passport where your photo is when you hand them your details at the desk.

What You’ll Be Asked: These people are similar to the TSA, in that you shouldn’t be funny with them. I’ve never had anyone be anything but courteous, but don’t worry if they seem a little intimidating. You’re likely going to panic and forget your name or something silly. It happens. Once when we were coming back in from a holiday they asked me where I was studying and how I was liking it to make sure I was legitimately going. I was exhausted and just dramatically sighed and said something about essays and they laughed and let me through. If that’s not a real student answer, I don’t know what is. :p For you though, they’ll just ask standard things like why you’re here, for how long, and sometimes what you’re planning on doing. Super easy, no stress. After that, they’ll dramatically stamp your passport and you’re in!

Be Free: At this point, you’ve survived the process and are now ready to see what wonders England has to offer you! Public transport is generally plentiful, and if you’re feeling particularly ambitious/mad you could always hire a car. The opportunities are many!

Safe travels!

— Kate

 

queue gardens amusement park

 

Let’s just go!

The university has opened online registration, and I am officially signed up (as much as I can before my campus visa checkpoint – don’t ask, I have no idea) for the University of Leicester! My student ID should be ready for me when I get there. I’m excited. 🙂

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.34.34 pmScreen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.34.43 pmAlso got word from the Museum Studies department with a tentative schedule of the first two weeks, and I’m pleasantly surprised to see that classes aren’t really early so far. I was trying to prepare myself for 8:00 times, but 9 and 10 are totally cool too. Just from the titles, it looks like a fascinating start!

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.43.37 pm

So now I’m only really left with buying a ticket for the bus, a ticket for the train to Leicester, and packing my bags. It’s one thing to sell off most of your life to get ready to live out of what fits in a suitcase. It’s another thing entirely when you start to fill up said suitcase. SO MANY THINGS. SO MANY CHOICES. What have I forgotten that might actually be really important?

Considering I’m to be living in Leicester for a year (10 months actually, then 2 months out interning, then who knows where next?), I really can’t bring all that much along with me. I suspect leaving the country makes a minimalist out of you eventually. I took the main idea of a packing list from Study Abroad and tweaked it a bit, but do you see anything I’m missing or really won’t need? I haven’t done a weigh in on my bags quite yet, so there may be some tossing out of things anyhow.

In reality, I can almost promise it will be me shoving what remains of my closet after losing weight these last two years into my bag with the questionably useful and/or ill-fitting but still beloved clothing going in last in case they need to be pulled out and left behind. Mom also managed to find a carry-on sized space saver bag, so the sweaters may be getting the big squeeze and going in my carry-on bag. Honestly though, I don’t think the weight limit is going to be a major issue. But with no further ramblings, I’ll leave you with the ULTIMATE STUDY ABROAD PACKING LIST. 😛

— Kate

The Ultimate Study Abroad Packing List

Clothing:

  • Underwear – two weeks’ worth (Two weeks worth? Let’s be real. All the underwear comes along. We don’t leave behind good underwear.)
  • Socks – two weeks’ worth (Yeah yeah, it’ll be the ones that aren’t questionably falling apart. They’re socks. Pretty sure I can get a new pair or two in England, just possibly.)
  • Camisoles (Layering all day, err’ day.)
  • Thermal leggings (I seriously doubt the use of these, but man are they comfy.)
  • Tops
  • Sweaters
  • Trousers
  • Skirts
  • A set or two of workout clothes (Will it promote my going to the gym? Unlikely.)
  • Pajamas
  • Swimsuit
  • Coat/Jacket
  • At least one nice outfit for formal occasions
  • Shoes (I fear my fancy sandals will not see much use, but then again, I’ve been living in Chacos since March. Yay for my body always running on high heat?)

Toiletries:

  • TSA Compliant Toiletry Kit (Enough to clean up for a day or two until I get things there. I can already sense my desperate need to shower upon arrival after learning my lesson last time.)
  • Brush and comb (If they weren’t needed right after said emergency shower, I’d say forget it.)
  • Contact lenses and solution (Yay being blind!)
  • Glasses (Does this really count if it’s on my face?)
  • Nail clippers (Teeny tiny justifiable-bringing-along-in-case-of-brutal-hangnail-attack pair.)
  • Makeup (No one likes to play games with new brands on makeup. Especially not ALL the makeup at once.)
  • Medications (Yay drugs! Now to make sure they all have my name written on them.)

Extras:

  • Some cash in £ (Pleased with myself now for having a handful of £2 coins and a fiver that accidentally came home with me last year. That’s some snack money whilst in the customs line!)
  • Purse/ wallet
  • Important documents (passport, visa, itinerary, plane tickets, ISIC card, etc.)
  • Outlet adapter (Actually not sure I’ll need one. Livin’ the USB plug life means international is SO much easier.)
  • Sunglasses (Didn’t need these once last time. I blame it on living in big sky country for the last four years.)
  • Cell phone with changed out SIM card for UK and USB charger (Many thanks for getting me that old iPhone unlocked and a UK SIM shipped over!)
  • Laptop and charger (Must not forget to change the plug on the charger!)
  • Camera w/cords and USB charger
  • Kindle and USB charger
  • Water bottle/ Nalgene bottle (Depending on space/amount of cares given, might just get one past security. I’m flying BA, they dole out tea and wine like it’s going out of style.)

If not now, when?

Fourth of July has come and gone, cousins have visited and gone home, and now with an approved visa I’m left to contemplate the fact that I am definitely going to do this. There was a brief hiccup this week as my pre-paid return envelope seems to have disappeared from my application packet that I sent to New York, but I sent them what they needed via email today so it should hopefully all be sorted out. Visa should be in my hands by next week!

I am rapidly vacillating between excited and terrified, but I think that both the emotions are to be expected really. With everything now in place short of a packed suitcase, it’s become much more realistic than the original abstract idea of doing this, but I don’t regret a bit of it. Like everyone keeps saying, this is a chance of a lifetime and I intend to make the absolute best of it. 🙂

— Kate