No one woke me up when September ended!

But seriously, that Green Day song has been the bane of my birthday for YEARS now. Oddly enough, no one mentioned it this year. This was finally the year I was allowed to sleep through September ending. Wild. So, what’s been happening?

Well, for starters we have a new and furry family member in our house! Her name is Ophelia and she’s the prettiest kitty in Colchester. (Significant Otter will argue the prettiest ever.) She spent the first week in our house hiding behind the sofa, and the next two only hanging out with us when we were sitting. Nowadays, she goes where she pleases and loves hanging out with us. This does lead to some comedic moments, like this morning when she accidentally fell in the laundry basket and nearly destroyed it getting out. However, she came out unscathed and came to purr on M’s legs whilst he tried to sleep a little longer.

I’ve also been on a bit of a museum binge (Surprising, I know.) recently and been to some new ones. My colleague managed to score some tickets to the Bart’s Pathology Museum, which is only open a few times a year. It’s a room filled with jars of human bits and skeletal remains. Basically, it’s disgusting and fascinating in the same go, and each jar has a little blurb of information on it, so you could easily spend a lot longer than your allocated hour there. It was originally used by the university as a teaching collection, but now the room is only ever used for exams. M says he’s sat some there and was wholly unimpressed. I loved it. Unsurprisingly, they don’t let you take close up photos of the specimens, but you can take room-wide shots. The room itself is cool just for its architecture.

Next was a staff field trip to our satellite museum in Tring. Someone described it to us before going as a Dead Zoo, and that’s actually a pretty apt description. Not in a terrible way, but I wouldn’t go if you have issues with taxidermy. It’s a small museum, but absolutely stuffed to the gills with specimens, and really helpful and friendly staff. Tring is a bit out of the way, but it’s definitely worth a stop. We got a fascinating backstage tour of the collections, and saw more eggs and bird remains in one room than I’ve probably ever seen alive in one area. They’ve got one of the best and most diverse collections for each, so if you’re researching birds, you’ll likely end up in the little town of Tring.

After a museum binge, I had two different work trips through September. First was the ToScA 2017 meeting, in which I had to give a talk on my work with the blue whale. It was only slightly terrifying, and I think it ended up okay. Over the three days, I met a load of interesting new people, learned some new tips and tricks in the tomography world, heard some cool new work going on, and got to have dinner on the HMS Warrior – the first ironclad ship built in 1860!

Towards the end of the month, I got to fly on one of the few uncanceled RyanAir flights up to Edinburgh to attend a Standing Up for Science workshop. While there, I learned all about working with the media as a scientist and how best to get work across to someone who will inherently not know what the topic is on. It was a really handy course, and I met even more cool people in varied fields with some fascinating works. It was a good month for meeting people! Unfortunately, I didn’t have the time to wander Edinburgh as I’d hoped, and was on the last flight of the evening home for a weekend with the family.

Towards the end of September of course, is my birthday! I was working late on the actual day, but the Saturday morning M and I had a nice lie in and then wandered over to the nearby village of Coggeshall. It was such a cool place, with over 300 listed buildings and two National Trust sites. I spent the day blissfully looking at old things, and my beloved M came along for the ride, enjoying a scone with me in the garden of the Paycocke’s House and a pint of beer at the medieval pubs I had earmarked. We ended the adventures with dinner at one of the pubs, which had a steak so good that I think we would both gladly go back the 13 miles to have it again. The weather behaved, my gifts from everyone were fabulous, and it was all in all a really good day.

Sunday morning began October, and with it my Sober October challenge. I’ve signed up to be sober for the entire month in order to raise money for the cancer support charity Macmillan. It’s a great cause and a good reason to give up alcohol for the month. I suspect by the end of it I will be a bit healthier and Macmillan will have a bit more to put towards helping people whilst they fight cancer. I’ll be taking donations all month, alongside of sorry looking photos of me in pubs with friends and a soft drink in my hand, so if you feel charitable, donate a pint’s worth to the cause. 🙂

And most recently, there was the car wreck outside of the Natural History Museum that had everyone in a tizzy. Turned out to be just a really bad taxi driver, and nobody had serious injuries. I wasn’t even at work when it happened as it was on a Saturday, and got woken up from a nap with my phone blowing up to ask if I’m okay. Grumpy yes, but okay. Honestly though, don’t let these things put you off coming to London. It’s a wild city with so much to offer. And if you want to see us here at the NHM, we’ve still got the Whales exhibition open where you can stand next to a flipper for a sense of perspective – and the ice rink will be opening soon!

All in all, it’s turning into a fine autumnal season. I’m looking forward to seeing what October will hold. 🙂

 

— Kate

April weather means friends flock together.

Or something like that. Over the last few weeks of March and the beginning of April, it seems the stars all aligned and everyone was able to meet up. And so meet up we did.

First and most far flung award goes to the lovely D, all the way from California! She and I met and became fast friends during our course at the University of Leicester, but sadly she had to go back to America at the end of the year. She’d come back for a week to see friends in both England and Wales, and we were graced with her presence for a few of those days. She swears we only let her stay because she brings us American junk food, but she’s welcome even without the Ranch dressing packets. 🙂 I can’t wait until we get to meet up again next – and hopefully it’ll be because she finally got a museum job here!

IMG_4034
Truly a fashion statement.

Next up we had the kitty couple from Leeds only a few days after D had to leave us for Gatwick. Sadly, the kitties were not in tow with them, but it was still a great weekend out. The sun even made a glorious appearance on Saturday, which was well received regardless of the temperature. Ended up going bowling, which I couldn’t even tell you when I did last! Thankfully, they seemed to know I was coming and had the gutter guards up on our lane. I still managed to lose spectacularly in both rounds. It was all good fun though, and you sure can’t beat those shoes.

To round out our meet ups to a respectable triad over the period, we were back up in Colchester to see M’s old friend Dr and Mrs Anaesthetist and their baby, who is quite possibly the cutest child in Colchester. They were currently working on making the back garden a nice English landscape and not the muddy war zone it looked like when they first moved in. The trellis is nearly complete and it looks like grass will be coming in soon. I imagine it will be more than summer ready soon enough.

Speaking of summer ready, we also did some lurking to see how our house is turning out. We couldn’t see much as they’ve done extensive building on the houses in front of it and the security panelling is still up, but it looked to be coming along nicely. The good Doctor later managed to capture a photo through his walk in the nearby woods, and it looks like everything is right on time. So excited!

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Photo courtesy of Dr Anaesthetist and his ability to find loopholes to the building site rules.

 

The good times can never last forever though, and the significant otter and were quickly back in the daily grind, with the poor thing having to work a weekend on top of it! Of course this meant that Saturday was glorious for having a BBQ. Alas! But hey, we have nice weather and the house is still on time. Can’t ask for too much right? 🙂

 

— Kate

Dissertation Delays

On the bright side, my dissertation is complete. On the darker side, it’s currently on a computer I’m locked out of this afternoon. Thankfully, I can get to it by this evening in a worst case scenario. It’s really strange being finished with it and having a few days left to spare. Not sure what I’m going to do for the next few days.

Oh wait, yes I do. I’m going to be packing things. I moved out of Leicester at the end of June, and now the favourite human and I are about to turn around and move to Norwich due to work commitments. He’s going to have an hour commute, and I’ll be on a two-hour commute down to London for my internship. Public transport for both of us, so I imagine we’ll both be sleeping whilst riding in the mornings. I’d say chatting with friends on the ride back, but phone service is admirably spotty on the train lines. I’m thinking attempting to re-read the Harry Potter series over the two months.

It’s going to be another shift in life, but it’s one I’m looking forward to happening. It’s going to be a house and not a flat for a change, and one we both get to create together, rather than feeling like a squatter in each other’s places. It’ll also be doing work directly in a museum environment for me, and I’m so excited to be out of the abstract of academia and back into the real world! From here on out it’s a great internship and job applications galore.

Also in terms of shift, it also feels like it’s time to shift this blog a bit. I suppose you can be a tourist forever, but if you want to live somewhere permanently, it becomes detrimental. I’ll continue to write (and hopefully a little more regularly), but rather than being an intrepid reporter for all things *different* between the US and the UK, I’d like to just write about life as it happens. Things that surprise, comfort, amuse, confuse even. It’s not going to devolve into a Dear Diary thing (I hope), but it just feels more and more awkward to write in the style I have been for the last few months. Instead, I’m going to try to tell stories. Hopefully decently written stories, but stories of settling into a new phase in my life and of all the cast that appear in it. I might even do an overhaul of the blog layout!

So let us spring forth with a new Kate, unencumbered by blog traditions! I’ll start this reformat with a piece I’ve adapted from my fellow blogger Inspired Life and list 20 things I’ve either learned about myself this year, or things about myself that have changed over the last few months.

  1. The further into academia I delve, the worse my cleaning obsessions get. Before university, I was a messy lady. Now, I’ve been spotted vacuuming and wiping counters on a regular basis. I even make the bed! (The bathroom remains the bane of my existence though.)
  2. My accent seems unlikely to change in the near future. The idioms have altered, but I still very commonly stand out as an American. And honestly, I’m fine with it. At first I wanted to do everything I could to blend in quickly, but now I’m finding it alright to just be who I am. Within reason anyway.
  3. I’m learning to better accept that not everyone will like me, and that sometimes you just can’t do anything about it. It stings to find out someone thinks ill of you, but you really can’t please everyone. Just try to be kind in general.
  4. I have been an idiot. Oh, hindsight. I count this as a good thing though. If I can look back at things I’ve done and realised it was a poor choice, then that means at least I’m not as likely to do it again.
  5. There is always time to read. You don’t realise how much TV and internet sucks up your time until you start reading more and realise how far behind you are on pop culture. There’s a balance to it I suppose. I managed to read 53 books last year, and I’m up to 28 so far this year. Some have been school books of course, but a good portion are just for pleasure. The not having to drive places thing really does help with this.
  6. I’ve reached the age where I no longer put my head to the pillow and don’t wake up again until the alarm buzzes. It’s never been insomnia for more than a day, but I’m commonly awake briefly in the middle of the night. We’ll definitely need to move the bed away from the wall in our new place, as being awake in the middle of the night is useless when you’re the one stuck facing the window.
  7. Just like when we moved across the US, there are things I miss from US. Would I want to move back? Not really. Would I like to visit often? Most definitely!
  8. Living the first year of my life with no animals in it has been rough. My chivalric love of cats from afar is getting ridiculous.
  9. I’ve realised that sometimes, the cheapest plane ticket is just not worth it.
  10. Having friends around the world is a fantastic thing, and the ones that keep in contact after all this time will likely be friends for life. With that said, it also really sucks when all your friends are nowhere nearby and you’ve got nothing to do on a Friday night.
  11. I have grown to greatly appreciate adequate public transport. It’ll be nice to drive again at some point, but being able to get nearly anywhere you need to go with public transport and your own two feet is phenomenal.
  12. I’m not sure how long I have to live here to stop being surprised by things, but today is not that day.
  13. I still hold firm that rain and thunderstorms are great. Mists and fogs of water consistently pouring from the sky all day? Not great.
  14. I’ve not gotten any slimmer than when I got here, but for possibly the first time in my life, I’m beginning to feel comfortable in my own skin.
  15. There is, in fact, a point where I can see too many ancient buildings. I never thought it was possible, but here we are.
  16. My alcohol tolerance has gone up considerably since moving to England, but I still don’t think I’ll ever manage to get to the level of drunkenness that the English manage grandly. It’s truly a sight to behold.
  17. I’m not sure I want to continue my education past a master’s degree. I think it might actually break me to attempt a PhD.
  18. If I did go back for a PhD though, it’d be back to my one true love of anthropology and not in museum studies.
  19. Being totally alone in a new city where no one knows who you are and you can do and see what you please is one of the most liberating things in the world. I’d recommend everyone should try it once, even if it’s just a cool new city nearby your hometown.
  20. Watching and learning how a culture works is very different from being immersed in a culture yourself. It’s very easy to say, “Well that’s different from what I know, but it seems to work for them.” It’s much more difficult to allow yourself to be placed into different cultural norms and not rebel against them. Some you will come to accept and love, and some you will consistently struggle with.

— Kate

the internet is coming to get us. well let's get it before it gets us.

How To: Get Around With No Car

Getting around without a car in England was something I was looking forward to, coming from a town in the US where the nearest grocery store was 2 miles away and the main shopping area was close to 3. This however is entirely dependent on how close to (or in) a city you live, though even if you’re in the countryside you can get by with just buses and trains if located in the right spot. Even in the cityscape, you have 4 main options: buses, taxis, trains, and feet.

Buses

Buses in Leicester are next to useless if you live near the city centre, as all of the buses terminate in the centre. This means if I wanted to take the bus to university that I’d have to take one to the city centre (going the wrong way!) and then wait for another one to take me the correct direction towards the campus. If you time it right and don’t miss your connecting bus you’ll get in at … exactly the same time as if you had walked. Needless to say, I don’t bother with the buses in Leicester unless I’ve got arms full with grocery bags or am visiting a village on the outside of the city.

However, buses can be useful in other cities. The one in Colchester is useful for the days you really don’t want to climb up the steep hill to the High Street, and they have a few lines that run across the town. How convenient! The only major issue with this is that (in any town, not just Colchester) you need to know the name of the stop you’re getting off at before you get onto the bus so you can pay the right fare. There won’t always be information as to where each bus line goes, so be prepared to look up this information on your phone ahead of time or brave the possible wrath of a disgruntled bus driver and a queue full of people who would really like you to just not get on.

Taxis

Taxis, while not something I’d use on a daily basis, are not nearly as expensive as you would think, and are sometimes very much worth it. Coming home from the other side of town late at night or with a suitcase is well worth the £6. You forget just how much you rely on your car until you don’t have one, as I have a time or two coming home late. If you can, call a private company in town as the famous black cabs are also generally the most expensive. They’re also the only ones that are legally allowed to be hailed off the street, so sometimes they’re worth it on that alone. It just depends on what you need. In this day and age it’s not so much an issue, but still make sure you’ve got cash on you for these rides just in case (and exact change if you’re going to use the bus!). Also be prepared to tip your driver. The tipping culture is much less extreme here than in the US, but there are still times when it is proper.

Trains

Trains I’ve spoken about before, so I’ll mostly just link you back to that entry. With that stated, trains are my main mode of long distance travel around the country. You can still have some trouble getting certain places though, especially if it’s a small village. You’ll need to prepare to catch a bus or get a ride from someone (or even hoof it) in these cases. This should be factored in to getting BACK to the train station too. Also worth noting is the power of the advance ticket. If you know for sure that you’ll be traveling on a certain day at a certain time, it’s well worth buying a ticket in advance. You can book them up to 12 weeks beforehand, and the sooner you do, the more likely you’ll get a great deal. Add in discounts for going at odd/off-peak hours and having a 16-25 railcard discount and it makes traveling much more feasible.

Feet

So you’re getting ready to go somewhere with no car. We’re going to say just in the city this time, as this is the day to day you’ll deal with. You need to become adept at knowing EXACTLY how long it takes to walk to get somewhere. Google Maps on my phone is generally pretty spot on for estimating walking times (24 minutes to campus!), but it’s always wise to pre-walk the path ahead of time or plan extra time to arrive somewhere when the timing is important. You also need to consider the importance that you will no longer have your car to act as a storage unit. You will become your own pack mule and either learn to travel light or develop new tone to muscles on your back and legs.

A good backpack is a must! At first I was hesistant and tried to get by with my crossbody messenger bag, but even the best of them can’t compete. It’s very common to see people with backpacks on though, even if they’re otherwise dressed really smart, so don’t worry about looking odd for it. Also, this should be a no-brainer, but make sure your bag is waterproof. Umbrellas don’t always cover your back side all the way and no one likes soggy papers or (god forbid) a wet laptop. Along this vein, make sure you either carry your lunch separately or be really confident in your food storage. You’ll always be in the worst spot when the broccoli juices leak out and there are rarely ever paper towels in the bathrooms here.

This bag logic will also inevitably spill over into your grocery bags. There are pros and cons to both though. When it comes to it, plastic bags:

  • Cut off blood circulation to your fingers, unless carrying very light items
  • Can’t be slid over the shoulder
  • Always have a chance of breaking due to weight strain or sharp object edges making holes (cereal boxes are notorious)
  • Bang your things around more, which could be devastating to your bananas and/or glass bottles
  • Some places make you pay for using them, to try to get you to be more eco-friendly

Reuseable bags are however:

  • Generally more comfortable (unless overstuffed and then they like to slide off your shoulders)
  • Fashionable or let you show off your favorite things/places (I’ve resisted the urge to pick up many reusable totes from the museums we’ve visited this year)
  • You have to remember to have one with you when you go out, which you sometimes won’t when you pick things up on the way home
  • Usually pretty good about not upsetting the self-checkout machines
  • Great for rescuing laundry, toting things to friends’, etc.

With this in mind, you’ll start changing your shopping habits a bit. The giant hauls of food don’t happen so often when you realise you have to carry it back. It also helps curb any therapy shopping too when you have to lug it all around town and back home. In general though you’ll just be walking around more, so it won’t feel like much. You just kinda learn to plan your life around it. You get in the habit of walking home with people or calling people up to make the walk pleasant, which is really nice. You can also plug in and tune out with music or podcasts. Regardless, you’ll adapt quickly and if you wear a pedometer you’ll find that reaching those healthy 10,000 steps a day is actually pretty easy to do. You’ll also find that you can in fact walk your bum off, but that it makes finding jeans SO much simpler.

In short, while having a car is really nice and I do miss it on occasion, getting by on foot is entirely doable in Leicester and I love it. At this point I wouldn’t want to drive on a daily basis. Anyhow, it’s getting close to dinnertime and I should probably go find something to cook. Talk to y’all later!

— Kate

ministry of silly walks

It’s All About the Mentality

Something that you will probably not consider too seriously (but totally should) when studying abroad is what you plan to do with yourself afterwards. After being here a few months I’ve realised that there are three main branches to this – the Education First, the Tourist, and the Not Leaving branches. These are of course geared towards non-EU students doing their entire degree abroad and not study abroad, as it’s all much different and sometimes easier if your country is a part of the European Union. It’s important you figure out early on which one you are, especially if you’re on a limited budget, so you know how to make the best of your year. Let me explain through broad, sweeping stereotypes of the groups.

The Education First

The Education First is at this university because it was the best option for their career choices. They can love, hate, or be indifferent towards this new country because they already have a goal workplace in mind (or lined up for them if they’re lucky). This person will go to events and see cultural attractions if it’s reasonable or doesn’t upend their workload, because their priority is first and foremost towards their education. Depending on the situation, they’ll go home for the long holiday periods and may go home for their dissertation if it’s economically feasible. This student will likely be the one with the smallest sum of student loans, because they’ve been planning in the long term what they want to do with their life.

The Tourist

The Tourist is likely planning on going back to their home country after their degree, but they may try for a job in their host country. Regardless, they aren’t entirely sure when they’ll be back in this new country and want to see and do as much as they can with this definite period of time. They will be travelling to see new cities every other weekend and out on the town as much as they can. They’ll likely try to make as many friends (and memories) as possible because this is a liminal year and should be lived to the fullest. This student will want to save up as much money as possible beforehand and be chill about cheap accomodation and odd hours for inexpensive transport options.

The Not Leaving

The Not Leaving is decently versed in visa regulations and is determined to become one of the limited accepted immigrants into their new country when their degree is done. They will likely be jockeying for anything to tack on their CVs that will make them stand out and will (like the Education First) be hesistant to going out on many adventures across the country. It’s not that they don’t want to go, but they see it as something to be visited later when they’ve got jobs and instead save the money for the few months post-degree that they’ll be applying for work before the student visa runs up. These students will want to save up money like the Tourist, but hoard it for the costs that trying to stay inevitably drag up.

When it comes down to it, most people in this experience won’t know for sure what they want to do until they’re already here. I know there are some folks in my programme that definitely started in one group and have migrated to another, and there are others who came here knowing exactly what they intended to do and are sticking to it. And you know what? That’s awesome either way. It’s just something you need to stop and think about when you decide to do your higher education in another country, and something to consider of the friends you make while you’re there. I know I haven’t gone on as many trips and events as some of the people in my group, and I only hope they don’t think I’m horribly antisocial, just maybe taking a different mentality of my time here. Or maybe that I’m just perpetually broke being a student on student loans. :p

— Kate

 

turns out meeting new people is a lot more complicated than I'd originally thought

Rugby and Ruins

Hello again!

I’m starting back up in lectures again, and so I’m also starting back up in blogging too! As promised last weekend, this will be a story about rugby and the Museum of London. Let us begin…

I am somewhat familiar with rugby, as I once tried out and briefly trained with the women’s rugby team at my high school. I quickly found out in just the training that I wasn’t cut out for it and my mother silently thanked the heavens for saving my teeth. 😛 However, that was also nearly 10 years ago, so what little I knew was pretty rusty. We’ve seen the university rugby teams around town this year, but all I’ve learned from them is that they’re like the UK equivalent of a fraternity in the hijinks they get into. We most recently saw them come into a pub dressed as a walking nativity scene (and that’s one of the tamer evenings).

So when I was offered the chance to come along to a proper rugby match here in Leicester, I was a total noob but totally excited to go. And it was well worth the chilly weather and wet seats to go! Leicester were up against their rival Bath, and Leicester came out with a fantastic 17-8 finish. At this point, I was hoping to find a great YouTube video to give a better explanation of the game than I would mumble out, but it appears that no one has made such a video yet. Instead, I will send you to WikiHow who can explain the basics without mucking it up like I inevitably will. Basically, I’m still lost at times, but I will definitely be going back to another game. I find it to be much more engaging than American football!

Later in the week, I also got a day to go and visit the Museum of London and I must recommend a visit if you’ve got some time to spare in the city! The museum is actually in the square mile of the City of London and has managed to be built both beside and IN a roundabout. It can prove a challenge to get inside, but once in it’s pretty darn cool. They’ve been tasked with telling the history of the city from before it was known as London to the modern era, and they’ve got a plethora of artefacts all the way through. If you look for it though, you can see which collections are their largest and which have likely been siphoned off to other museums in the area. The prehistoric section and semi-modern eras of London are well represented, but the Roman era sees a lot of (well done) reproductions and the plague era is skipped over almost entirely.

However, the Museum of London is fascinating with their collection of human remains – the largest in the UK! In nearly every exhibit they seem to have a skull that tells the human story of the era. There have been many facial reconstructions and explanations of how archaeologists have discovered much more about the past through them. In the sections lacking in original artefacts, these human remains and excellent reproductions (both 1:1 ratios and miniatures) of rooms and buildings of the time help keep their visitors engaged. It’s free to visit and right off of the Barbican Tube stop, so pop by if you’re near.

Anyhow, that’s all for now folks! I’ll talk to you later. 🙂

— Kate

What to Expect When You’re Expecting (to Move to Another Country!)

No no, no babies here. Well, perhaps a food baby from dinner tonight.

Annnnyway, I’ve been in the UK for a month now. A month on the dot today. And it’s crazy how quickly this month has gone by! (Suppose I should stop calling it jet lag and go back to the usual student sleep deprivation excuse.) It feels like I’ve done so much and yet so little in the space so far, though I think part of that was having 3 weeks to just explore at my leisure. Now that I’ve gotten a full week of the program under my belt, I get a feeling I’ll be a lot busier, though I promise I will get in a better habit of posting at least once a week, probably on Sundays like today.

So what’s happened in England to Adventurer Kate since we heard from her last? (I really wish that was still a legit job title.) Well, I’m already used to playing Guess the Time Zone to keep up with friends and family across the globe, but I got a new one this week when Dad went to Japan for a business trip. Technology makes this all even more surreal, as he FaceTimed me from his hotel to say hi before dinner as I was getting ready for lunch here. Still great to see him! Also got to fiddle around with FaceTime audio some and called family while waiting on my laundry to finish at my building’s laundry room on the ground floor. Some people will say that being in constant communication with people back in the States will just make you more homesick, but it really makes it so much nicer for me knowing I can still call my parents and tell them about what a great/awful day I’ve had. It’s also great to hear about the little things like how Mom’s classroom is doing or what’s for dinner there (I’m still jealous of that Dairy Queen run you guys. 😛 ).

Another biggie I suppose, is that I had my birthday Monday, as well as the first day of term. I’m now finally old enough for an insurance drop in prices and I can rent a car without any restrictions! Yay for 25? I have to give a major thanks to everyone that sent me cards and presents all the way out here, as it’s been immensely helpful in getting those last few things I’ve been missing in the flat. When everything finally arrives in the post, I’ll have to get up photos. I even got a ton of well wishes and a beautiful bookmark from some of my fellow students, which was incredibly sweet. 🙂

Classes have been… overwhelming to say the least. I was warned about the differences in the US and UK educational systems, but it’s another thing entirely to witness them. Everything is just assumed that you know, and you have to pretty much accost someone to get any specifics out of them. Like my student loans for example… I did get some excitement waiting in line to find out their whereabouts when the guy in front of me passed out from dehydration. After he crumpled to the ground, he woke up, started apologising profusely, then said he hadn’t had drinkable water in his room for two days. Not sure why he hadn’t gone and gotten a water bottle, but I wasn’t about to ask. Turns out when they said they would release my check on the 29th, they really meant more that the university would receive them, but that I wouldn’t get a check until tomorrow for most of it and the remainder another week after to make sure they don’t get screwed over with the currency conversion. So tomorrow I get to pick up the check and deposit it at Lloyds Bank (I have a UK bank account now! Hooray no more ATM fees!) and then wait for that to appear, and THEN I can get my landlords their next chunk o’ change. Glad that’s not due up immediately. Really, I grumble, but I get a feeling I’ll get the hang of this new education and university system without too much grief.

Classes and time after have gone by quickly, and I haven’t been taking many photos, but it’s because I’ve been hanging out and meeting new people in the department. Having awesome people to talk to and meet up with so soon has made all the difference in the world in acclimating to the university, and I’m so glad it’s worked out the way it has. I’ve not had the chance to speak more with locals, but we have a major international influence in the programme and we’ve all had some fun adjusting to the little changes in life here in the UK, such as…

Not sure what's a worse idea - these or the Cappuccino Lays variety.
Not sure what’s a worse idea – these or the Cappuccino Lays variety.

 

“So a herd of well-dressed men came into a pub we’re in and a lone man with them came in half naked with a tyre and fishnet stockings. It’s not a stag night. What is this?”  “Definitely not a stag?”  “I asked. Rugby team apparently?”  “Ahh, that explains everything.”
“So a herd of well-dressed men came into a pub we’re in and a lone man with them came in half naked with a tyre and fishnet stockings. It’s not a stag night. What is this?”
“Definitely not a stag?”
“I asked. Rugby team apparently?”
“Ahh, that explains everything.”
Well now I have to buy both and see the difference.
Well now I have to buy both and see the difference.

Oh man, there’s really been quite a lot come to think of it. But it’s now midnight and I have a 9 am class to get to tomorrow, so it’s off to bed for me. Expect another post by next Sunday at the latest, I promise.

 

— Kate