February, aka WHY IS IT STILL COLD Month

Right, so. Survived January, only just. I will have you know that the Dry January was under hilariously loose terms and that I only drank eight days out of the entire thirty-one. I have excuses at the ready and everything. There were two days with leftover champagne or prosecco, and we all know that it’s a travesty to pour these things down the sink. There was one Really Long Week that was rewarded with two pints of cider and a tot of rum. Our wedding anniversary was of course accounted for, and there was a birthday celebration in there at work.

Basically, my “dry” January should really be what the rest of the year looks like. I’m aiming to continue only indulging when there’s actually a social event and not just because I’ve made it to the weekend. My sleep is a much better quality, and weight loss is actually much easier to achieve. Shocking, right?

I tried starting up doing some jump rope this last weekend, but it was still raining/snowing and COLD AS ALL GET OUT. I did have plans to start with the new year, but I then managed to fall down a flight of steps at Liverpool Street and shredded my knee, so had to wait for that the heal up. Then the office head cold hit and I sat/slept on the sofa most evenings and complained bitterly about my lack of breathing out of my nose.

Final results at the end of the month: 1.7 kg (3.7 lb) lost

So what else happened this month?

Well, we discovered the BBC Big Cats programme was on, and Ophelia was ALL ABOUT IT. We’ve had to save the download as she loves watching it so much. Guys, we’ve turned the cat into a TV addict. We’re bad cat parents.

As mentioned earlier, our two year wedding anniversary came up! It’s hard to believe it’s been two years, but hopefully it always stays that way. We had a great week of festivities, and even managed to somewhat stay in the anniversary present tradition of cotton for the second year. Though I think really we ended up getting wool for each other. Eh, clothing. We’ll call it good.

Dippy finally went live on the museum’s website, so I’m finally allowed to talk about the 3D scan and print we did of him. Honestly, the print has been sitting in our office window for months now. He’s very popular to take selfies with. Been doing lots of scanning on another two projects in the meantime, which hopefully will be hitting the airwaves soon so I can tell you all about it. Needless to say, they are Pretty Cool.

In Boring Adult Life, we got a new IKEA wardrobe for the spare bedroom, and M heroically put it together over a Saturday afternoon. Slowly, our house is looking less like a visible hoarders home. Just don’t look under the beds or in the wardrobes. It did make a huge improvement to the room though, and has now banished all the cardboard boxes from the house except for the in the office. That will be the final frontier in our house for making a massive storage difference I think. All the remaining cardboard boxes need a sort through, and we probably need another bookshelf. After that though, the remaining piles of stuff around the house should evaporate. From there, we might even consider proper decoration of the walls and things. Heady times.

I suppose I’ll round it out with the weather, being an English institution and all. It keeps snowing and upsetting everyone, except children of course. So far the snow has gotten me stuck at home for two days because the trains were so bad, and ended up with a cancelled driving lesson. Even the cat is having none of this weather and has basically given up on any major adventures into the back garden at the moment. Storm Fiona came breezing in towards the end of the month and caused absolute havoc with all the London commuters, knocking down multiple trees, blowing cars around a bit, and gusting with such force that one had to walk with a forward lean to get anywhere. If it were in America, Jim Cantore would have been spotted nearby, reporting the current conditions to the Weather Channel.

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Finally though, it looks like there may be a hint of spring once this current frozen week ends. The daffodils and snow drops are sprouting, and the trees are showing a slight hint of buds on the tips of the branches. As of 10 February, the sunset won’t begin until 5 PM, meaning I may actually get to leave work with sunlight again. Definitely not counting down or anything (I am totally counting down), but by mid-March the sun won’t set until 6 PM and I might even get to see scenery on my train ride home!

So, this month is the No Snacks month. Wish me luck. Actually, wish me impressive weight loss. That would be much more useful than luck. Hopefully will write again before the end of the month!

 

— Kate

New Year, but not new resolutions as such.

I think I did New Year Resolutions like twice when I was a teenager and they always fail by March at the latest. Writing down something major to change and then just expecting to stick to it through the year is a hilarious and depressing way to start a year. Heck, I’ll be struggling to remember it’s 2018 and not 2017 until April. Why would I expect major life changes to stick so easily?

Instead dear readers, I’ve decided to do a year of 30(ish) day challenges. If I can make it through a month and it sticks, awesome. If not, it’s only 30 days, and that’s something worthwhile in itself. I won’t lie, I’ve done some of these challenges because I wanted to fit it neatly into this blog. Also, I realised a lot of the original challenges were weight and diet related and it looked a bit bleak. Whilst weight is a big issue for me, I don’t want it to take over my life for a year!

There will be some things that overlap and some overlying things that runneth over. For starters, actually sticking to my calorie target for bare minimum weight loss will be in the background this year, particularly in this first quarter of the year, which I have termed the Diet Quarter. Speaking of which, the other three quarters have been named as well – the Willpower Quarter, the Mental Health Quarter, and the Exercise Quarter. Why is exercise at the end of the year you ask? Well for one, M would graciously let me attempt all the cooking over Christmas, but we all know that would end poorly. Secondly, enjoying nature for 30 minutes is much more pleasant when you aren’t cold and being rained on. Also, I’ve got grand ambitions for starting jump rope as an overlying thing that will runneth over throughout.

So here below is the approximate plan for the year:

The Diet Quarter

 

January

A traditional Dry January, with some provisos. Our wedding anniversary is right in the middle of the month, and I want to celebrate it with something more than Diet Coke. I do not want to hear about your mocktail ideas instead. Just let me have this. It won’t be as strict as my Sober October challenge was, as I’m not raising money in my name. If you feel so inclined, I’ll leave a link for one off donations to the UK eating disorder charity Beat throughout the first three months as part of the Diet Quarter. Be healthy in what you do and all that, yeah?

February

No snacks. Sounds easy, will likely be very hard. Having tracked my food throughout the year, I know full well that snacks are the main reason I am not back at the weight I want to be. Mercifully a 28 day challenge, but hoping this one will stick.

March

Mindful eating and all that jazz. Mostly just retraining myself to eat small, slow bites and not eat meals like a starving animal. I’m halfway tempted to buy one of those forks that vibrates if you’re eating too quickly, but may just eat everything with tiny cutlery for children over the first fortnight. That would at least bring humour into the situation. This is also a good challenge to gear myself up with for the next quarter as well.

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Sweet dreams are made of this.

The Willpower Quarter

April

The no-money month. Okay, okay. Obviously some money will be spent, but on things that absolutely have to be had – food, toiletries, train tickets – those kinds of things. Again, looking back over bank statements over the last year, I am guilty of buying snacks at the station, ordering takeaways when we had food we could make, and buying random toys and clothes under retail therapy that while used didn’t need to be bought. It would be really nice to be able to take all that money saved and throw it at some debt.

May

No mindlessly checking my phone when I’m at home. We all do this, and I think we all know it’s not great (especially around other people). So for the month of May, if I’m at home my phone will be allowed to roam the house with me and I can answer calls and texts, but will have to be left in pre-decided Phone Homes where I can’t readily pick it up and scroll out of boredom/fidgetiness. I married a great guy, and I should be using the limited time in the day to actually see and talk to him, not just show the poor soul the latest internet memes. He’ll just get those while I’m on the train. 😉

June

Rolling into the mental health of the next round will be finding something nice to say about myself every day. Listing general good things about the world is much easier than being kind to myself, and that’s incredibly messed up. So to push myself into a new mindset, let’s use all of this newfound willpower to start thinking nice thoughts.

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The cats of the internet will have to wait.

The Mental Health Quarter

July

Spend at least 30 minutes a day outside in nature. Like proper nature, not just a walk around the block or a stroll from one museum down Exhibition Road and into another. I’m setting down the rule that the 30 minutes have to be walking on something unpaved. I’m debating if listening to podcasts whilst wandering is acceptable. We shall see. Regardless, getting out every day and getting some sun while this country actually sees any is going to be important.

August

Taking over cooking. I should explain. I am physically capable of cooking. I have actually cooked things successfully. I still cook occasionally when M is on night shifts. Generally though, he does the cooking and I’ll help out occasionally and otherwise clean up the leftover mess. It works, and we both like the roles we have. However, everyone always tells me that it’s therapeutic to cook, and that it’s good for the soul and all that. So I thought I’d give it one more go and see if by the end of the month I too have achieved the chef’s nirvana I hear rumour of.

September

Easing out of the mental health months will be a month-long project of writing down the different aspects of my life that I am thankful for. These always start off easy, then get cheesy, then get downright ridiculous before being abandoned somewhere around Day 16 at most. This time, I’d like to finish a full 30 days. It’ll be interesting to see where I end up delving towards the end, and also finding out if there are any themes that emerge.

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See? There’s some greenery.

The Exercise Quarter

October

Actually getting 10,000 steps EVERY DAY for a month. Usually if I’m on a work day, I get all the steps. However, any holidays or weekends are usually atrocious. Right now post-Christmas, my FitBit says I have an average of 5,998 steps per day if that gives you an idea of it. I’d like to add a monetary challenge to this to incentivise myself and make it hurt if I don’t reach it, but I don’t want to give money to some Evil Organisation. Also, if it goes towards something like a gadget for M that would drive me crazy, he’ll likely try to hamper said efforts. I’ll need to think about this one.

November

Stairs only. I will regret this with every fibre of my being with any deep line tube travel. I will definitely regret it with the fact that I currently work on the 5th floor (US 6th floor) of the building. But if this challenge doesn’t fall under exercise, I don’t know what would.

December

Finally, I want to end the year with some extra space in my clothes so I can eat ALL the cheeses. I’ve finally stopped lying to myself and telling myself I’ll run in the winter. Instead, I’ve found a few indoor 30 minutes or less routines. I’ll pick one closer to time and subject myself to it for the month. I may even convince the Significant Otter to join in. Maybe.

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Okay, these stairs could get a pass on grounds of health and safety.

So there we are – game plan for the year laid out. Now to see what madness comes of it, and to see if only taking little steps of 30 days at a time makes it any easier for things to stick. Wish me luck?

 

— Kate

Hidden Places: Lacock

Everyone always goes to London when they come from America. I get it. It’s got all the big museums and attractions. I’m not saying you shouldn’t go to London. I love London. But if you want something old and beautiful and uniquely English, you need to go to the West Country to visit the little village of Lacock.

Lacock is in Wiltshire, about 3 miles away from the much larger town of Chippenham. Nearly the entire village is owned by the National Trust, and it fiercely maintains its quaint, historic appearance because of this.

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Pretty sure I’ve seen this in Harry Potter.

Lacock has been around since at least the time of the Domesday book, in which is was mentioned as having a population of about 175 people. There is an abbey in the village that was founded in 1232 and is frequently used for films as it is in fantastic shape. The village itself survived through the ages off the wool trade and being a crossing point for the nearby River Avon.

With the exception of the abbey, most of the houses in the village are from the 1700s. However, there is still a medieval church, a 15th century inn, and a 14th century tithe barn still standing. They’re all beautiful architecture, and it isn’t uncommon in the warmer months to find people using sites for wedding photos!

The Talbot family (of historical photography fame) have owned the village for centuries, up until 1944 when Matilda Talbot gave the estate to the National Trust. You can see the grave of Henry Fox Talbot in the Lacock village churchyard. Unlike other National Trust sites though, this is still a living estate! Lacock obviously thrives off tourism, but people live in the village and even have a small school.

Because the village is so fiercely maintained in its historic state, it makes for prime filming. Signs for businesses cannot be posted to the wall like any other town, which makes it easy to work into many different time periods and places. Among other things, you’ll have seen the village in Pride and Prejudice (1995), Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, and Downton Abbey.

All of this culminates in a gorgeous afternoon out, walking down the charming roads, having a pint in a medieval inn, and maybe even doing a bit of crafts shopping in the locally owned shops. Some of the houses will be opened during the day so you can get a feel for the interior of them, and some you can even rent for a holiday if you feel so inclined! I would definitely consider it as something slow paced to do, and a stunning base camp to go see the Neolithic attractions that Wiltshire is so well known for.

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Just a bit of medieval doodles. No big deal.
So if you’re looking for something off the beaten tourist path as an international visitor, I cannot recommend this place highly enough!

 

–Kate

A Devon Wedding (Autumn 2016)

Mid-November rolled around and we were off on the road again in the Little Red Mini, actually back on most of the same route we’d recently taken to Padstow. It wasn’t Cornwall we were aiming for this time though, but for Devon. One of M’s old friends was getting married in the beautiful countryside, and we’d been invited to come.

We drove out after work, getting in to our Airbnb later than intended. The hosts were absolutely phenomenal though and even gave us directions when we got lost. Seriously, if you want a nice place to stay in Devon with amazing hosts, Nicola and Simon were top notch. They even left us some milk and a bottle of wine in the cottage!

After getting everything settled that Friday night, M and I fell fast asleep and woke the next morning to last minute outfit ironing before the wedding. Suited up and ready to go, our hosts were even so lovely as to drive us up to the Buckland Filleigh manor the wedding was at, as it was raining heavily at the time.

The couple made a excellent choice in their venue, and the decor they brought along really went well with it.

The ceremony itself felt very intimate, and they celebrated the official union at the end by popping streamers over the crowd from the mezzanine above. The look on the two newlyweds was enough to make anyone’s cheeks hurt from smiling. They were so very much happy and in love right then. 🙂

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From there it was dining, dancing, and celebratory drinks into the wee hours of the night! I think we all danced until our feet were aching (and possibly no longer in our heeled shoes), then plopped on sofas and chairs around the house and had the wide range of conversations that come along with any wedding get together. Some of the bride’s family had come all the way from Australia, and had really cool stories to tell about home.

Finally, M and I walked back under a full moon to our cottage, ate some late night pork pies, and crawled into bed. If we had such a great time, I can only imagine the new married couple did even better. 🙂

— Kate

Back to America, Part Three (Summer 2016)

Back in town and blissfully back on wifi, we all began to rush around and get this party started. What party you might ask? Well, due to the nature of transatlantic weddings, my parents (read: Mom) didn’t get to do nearly as much for the wedding as they would have liked to do. To make up for it, we had a second reception in the US for everyone to either come party again or come celebrate if they missed the wedding.

Mom did not mess around on this front. She completely transformed the back yard into a venue and rented some tables and decor for the event. Dad was helping with music and by cooking a metric ton of BBQ. I suspect a few of us may still have calluses from helping to shred all that meat. Oh, and there was a trip to Sam’s Club.

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This is only part of the supplies.

When it was all said and done though, my parents had pulled off one really awesome summer party! We had SO MANY people come from across the US to say hello and congrats, and it was amazing to catch up with everyone. I only wish the party was even longer, so I could have spent more time with so many wonderful people.

Sadly, everyone had to go home eventually. We managed to get the house back into a semblance of order relatively quickly and then tried to pass off all the leftovers in quesadilla form to all of our helpers. We also had to remove some of Mom’s twinned UK and US mini flags in the front of the house because some neighbors were threatening to deface the yard. Rude! I mean, the 4th of July was two days after the party, but c’mon – it’s been a few centuries now guys.

It’s tradition in my parents’ town to do a 4th of July parade through the streets, so we all woke up and walked over to the portion near the neighborhood. It did not disappoint. Truly, they know how to do patriotic well. It seems they haven’t entirely banned the practice of throwing candy at small children on the sidelines, but they’ve had to really push the “please don’t run in front of the cars” rule to allow it. Oh yes, and the Idaho Potatoes truck threw out individual bowls of instant potato mix. I can tell you this because one of our group caught one. Ah, small towns.

After witnessing Americana in all it’s glory, we all headed back to the house to get ready for the Melaleuca Freedom Celebration on the river that evening. The company set off 30 minutes of non-stop professional fireworks accompanied with music to celebrate Independence Day completely for free. The only payment is if you want seats outside at the dinner they host. You get a guaranteed place, a meal, and don’t have to stake a claim to a section of the river, so it’s usually a pretty good deal.

Having been abroad for nearly a year at this point, listening to the general patriotic speeches given was interesting. You develop a bit of an outsider’s perspective of your own country when you live away from it, and it was really different to see it now. I suppose it’s one of those things you just have to experience personally to really understand what I’m talking about.

After all this non-stop activity, we finally began to slow down a bit. The day after the fireworks, M and I had a wander around town and then got hopelessly lost in the foothills driving amongst the giant windmill farm. The next day we sent the boys out to hang out and Mom and I had some bonding time out roaming the stores around town and generally catching up.

On 7 July, the four of us all piled into the car and drove out to see Craters of the Moon National Monument, as well as the nearby EBR-I reactor museum. Craters of the Moon is otherworldly indeed. It contains a vast section of three major lava fields. These all lie along the Great Rift of Idaho, which contains some of the best examples of open rift cracks in the world. One of the deepest on earth is located here, measuring 800 feet. In these fields you can see almost every variety of basaltic lava, as well as some cavities in the lava left by incinerated trees from one of the explosions around 2,000 years ago. There are also plenty of lava tube caves, though you need a permit from the front office to go in for safety reasons, and we didn’t get around to picking up one.

Needing some time out of the glaring sun, we then drove over to EBR-I. Also known as Experimental Breeder Reactor I, it is a decommissioned nuclear research reactor out in the middle of the desert. Its claim to fame comes from 1951 when it became one of the world’s first electricity generating nuclear power plants. Some of the original light bulbs lit up by this are still on display today, as well as a bit of wall in which all the employees working there at the time have signed for posterity. After this first test run, EBR-I continued to produce enough electricity to power its own building as well as the neighboring town of Arco. It was used for further experiments until it was finally decommissioned in 1964. It is now open to the public for tours and is a pretty fascinating place to visit – if you don’t mind the desert drive.

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We eventually headed back as the afternoon wore on. The last few days we spent in town were just nice and local – spending time with my family and enjoying the beautiful summer days. Finally though, the day came that we had to head back to the UK. We all drove down to Salt Lake City together and enjoyed some cheesecake from the Cheesecake Factory, then slowly wound our way through to the check in. Only minimal tears were had, but plenty of hugs and well wishes were traded instead.

The flight back was relatively uneventful (thankfully) and we safely returned to British soil. I also learned a fun new fact after standing by myself in the non-EU/UK customs line. Apparently if you’re flying together, you can go through the EU/UK customs line with your spouse and not have to spend a year and a day waiting to get through otherwise. A lesson that was handy later on in the year!

All in all, I had an amazing time going back to see everyone, and would love to do it again. However, I think it’s now time for some of my lovelies to come back this way! 😉

 

— Kate

Seaside Honeymoon (January 2016)

For our honeymoon, we decided to stay in the country and enjoy the quiet Cornish seaside town of Padstow. Well, quiet in January anyway, but that’s a story for another day. It’s a long journey and at the time we didn’t have a car, so we took the chance to ride in a sleeper train all the way from London to Penzance and then get a cab across to Padstow. It was a really fun experience, but you should know that each cabin contains a bunk bed for two, so decide ahead of time who’s sleeping on the top bunk.

However, you get two places to sleep, a coat rack, some luggage space, a mirror, a window, and a washbasin with a towel and soap all behind one lockable door. We spent the first half of our evening in the lounge car watching the English countryside at night pass by whilst we sipped beverages and ate crisps. The rest we snoozed away in our bunks. We were woken at 7 with bacon sandwiches and left the train to a beautiful Cornish sunrise off the Atlantic Ocean. From there, we managed to get to Padstow and had a relatively laid back first day with a nap and a shower high on the list.

Padstow itself is now a tourist hotspot for foodies thanks to Rick Stein and his series of restaurants across town. Seriously, his fish and chips will ruin all other fried cod for you for life – it’s that good. Originally though, Padstow was an old fishing port that goes back at least as far as the Domesday Book. There are remnants of that heritage in the port tours and nautical themes of art and food around the area, but it’s mostly faded into the tourism industry these days.

We did not suffer for being in a tourist area though. Instead, we feasted like royalty and enjoyed the atmosphere of pubs around the harbour. We wandered the streets of the then-empty town as it was in off-season, then wandered out into the countryside of the Camel Estuary. It was a quiet week for just the two of us where it felt like the town was all for us. I would love to go back again in the winter months and enjoy the peace with my significant otter again sometime.

Sadly, we did have to come back to the real world on the other side of the country, but it was a wonderful week long break to have.

–Kate

 

Our Wedding! (January 2016)

16 January 2016 – a new day in our lives together.

Photos generally do most of the talking for a wedding, but since I enjoy a modicum of privacy on the internet at large (and I’m sure my guests would too), I’ve gone and pulled all the images our photographer took without faces in them.

Needless to say, the day was AMAZING, exactly what we could have hoped for, and at the end of it all I was married to my best friend. This was wonderful to go back through the photos over a year on and enjoy the moment again. 🙂